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Richard Gere: Settlements are an ‘absurd provocation’

Richard Gere

American actor and humanitarian activist Richard Gere has described illegal Israeli settlement “an absurd provocation”, Israel’s Haaretz newspaper reported on Sunday.

In an interview with the paper, Gere said: “Obviously, this occupation is destroying everyone. There is no defence of this occupation.”

Addressing the issue of illegal settlements in the occupied Palestinian territories, he said: “Settlements are such an absurd provocation and, certainly in the international sense, completely illegal.”

They [settlements] are certainly not part of the programme of someone who wants a genuine peace process.

Gere said that he does not like violence and noted that the Israelis should feel secure, but stressed that this must not be at the expense of the Palestinians.

“I denounce violence on all sides of this,” he said, “and, of course, Israelis should feel secure. But Palestinians should not feel desperate.”

While speaking to Haaretz, Gere defended the Israeli NGO Breaking the Silence, which exposes crimes committed by the Israeli soldiers against Palestinians on the ground.

He said that he was appalled by the demonisation of the group by the Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and others.

#IllegalSettlements

“To question authority makes you a traitor?” he asked. “If you question bad policies you are a self-hating Jew? That is insane. And, of course it is the last resort of tyrants.”

Gere also criticised American President Donald Trump because of his unbalanced policies regarding refugees.

“Trump has made ‘refugee’ and ‘terrorist’ the same meaning,” he said, “it was not so long ago that ‘refugee’ was someone who was running from a fire. Someone who needed help… And now that person is a terrorist, a dangerous person, someone to be shunned and kept out.”

“Everybody needs to speak out, no matter what their job description is,” he said.

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  • peepsqueek

    “They [settlements] are certainly not part of the programme of someone who wants a genuine peace process.” -What does a genuine peace look like in the Middle East? How do you make a “genuine” with a government that does not recognize your right to exist? And Hamas: No Muslim shall rest until the banner of Islam flies over every inch of the land. What kind of genuine peace have Palestinians offered? They cannot maintain security of their own borders.

    Palestinian Arabs have applied for UN statehood and want Jerusalem to be a 23rd Arab Capital. They want to fly the Pan-Arab colors of the former Caliphates over Jerusalem. They want the West Bank (biblical birthplace of David, Solomon, and Jesus to be free of Jews. What does a “genuine” supposed to look like? Does anyone have a balanced scale?

    • Du Kium

      You suggest to colonize the West Bank because it was the “biblical birthplace of David, Solomon, and Jesus”. So, please, be consistent and ask Israel to return the coast between Ashdod and Ashkelon, which has never been part of any ancient Israelite kingdom. The numerous archaeological expeditions carried out over decades in Ashkelon have
      confirmed that it was never conquered by the ancient Israelites. And even if one assumes that there was a conquest, the occupation of an area for a few years does not mean that it represented part of a larger “historic Jewish homeland”. Otherwise, the many Philistine raids and sometimes occupations of Israelite towns as far east as the Jordan River
      valley would also make these areas “less Israelite”.
      —-
      “Free of Jews”?
      The Jordanian law banned land sales to Israeli citizens, not to Jews. The law was passed in 1973, when Israel and Jordan were still technically in a state of war. Although morally objectionable, it is hardly surprising that a state is committed to ban land transfers to citizens of an enemy country in wartime.
      Many intellectuals and Palestinian leaders in the West Bank have clarified on several occasions that any Jew who
      wants to live in their community must be free to do so. To this, Nazmi Jubeh, an internationally-renowned Palestinian archaeologist, added, “when Israel was created, the Palestinians were already here and accounted for the vast majority of the local population. This is why there are now over one million Palestinians in Israel. In contrast,
      Israeli settlers arrived in the Palestinian territories through violence and incentives received in recent years from Israeli governments. Equating the former to the latter is not only simplistic, but also morally reprehensible.”

      • peepsqueek

        “You suggest to colonize the West Bank because it was the “biblical birthplace of David, Solomon, and Jesus”. ” — I do not read Arabic, but the English translation that I have read is Sura 5:21) that God granted the Land of Israel to the Children of Israel and ordered them to settle there. In addition, it is predicted that before the end of days, God will bring the Children of Israel to retake possession of the Land, gathering them from the different countries and nations (Sura 17:104). — I am an atheist, but where is your balanced scale?

        “The Jordanian law banned land sales to Israeli citizens, not to Jews. The law was passed in 1973” —- After the Jordanians, captured the “West Bank” including East Jerusalem in 1948, they forcibly evicted all Jewish residents who were rightfully there. They uprooted Jewish cemeteries, using the grave-markers for pavers and other projects. They destroyed almost every synagogue. Later, after the ’67 war, Jews have rightfully started to return. In 1973, the Jordanian administration was out of the picture.

        • Du Kium

          dukium

          • peepsqueek

            “religion is a private matter between you and your god and not a [political tool]”??????

            There are 57 declared Muslim States at the United Nations, all members of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation, the largest voting bloc at the UN General Assembly.

          • Du Kium

            And I oppose each and every person, entity, or state that uses religion for political purposes. Not only but particularly if for taking over the land and/or the houses of other human beings on (pseudo)religious grounds.

          • peepsqueek

            On October 13, 1932, Iraq became a sovereign state and it was admitted to the League of Nations. Iraq still was messed up by a complex web of social, economic, ethnic, religious, and ideological conflicts, all of which retarded the process of state formation. The declaration of statehood triggered an intense competition for power in the new entity. Sunnis and Shias, cities and tribes, sheiks and tribesmen, Assyrians and Kurds, pan-Arabists and Iraqi nationalists–all fought for places in the emerging state structure. The system was overwhelmed by these conflicting sectarian demands. What has changed?

          • Du Kium

            The region, and Iraq in particular, has historically witnessed a level of coexistence higher than that registered in most of the rest of the world, Europe included. You are simplifying much more complex issues.

          • peepsqueek

            Not under Arab rule! The Iron fist of Saddam and Sons made it look like co-existance.

            President Clinton signed the Iraqi Liberation Act of 1998, to remove Saddam from power, for numerous violations of UN Security Counsel Resolutions. The violations were not superseded by the need to protect the Iraqi people, but acts of aggressive non-complience

            Security Council Press Release
            4644th Meeting (AM)
            OFFERS FINAL CHANCE TO COMPLY, UNANIMOUSLY ADOPTING RESOLUTION 1441 (2002)
            Holding Iraq in “material breach” of its obligations under previous resolutions, the Security Council this morning decided to afford it a “final opportunity to comply” with its disarmament obligations, while setting up an enhanced inspection regime for full and verified completion of the disarmament process established by resolution 687 (1991). — (Saddam was in violation of 17 Security Council Resolutions since 1991)

          • peepsqueek

            Egyptians were not Arabs, nor did they speak Arabic. Syrians (Assyrians) were not Arabs, nor did they speak Arabic, Moroccans (Berbers) were not Arabs, nor did they speak Arabic, Iraqis (Kurds, Assyrians, Armenians, Azides, etc) were not Arabs nor did they speak Arabic, Libya was not Arab, nor did they speak Arabic, the Sudan (tribal Africa) was not Arab, nor did they speak Arabic, Tunisia was not Arab, nor did they speak Arabic. Why are they all called Arab Countries, belong to the League of “Arab” Nations, and have to live under some form of Islamic Sharia, which is Arabian??

          • Du Kium

            So what? Let me quote M.Rodinson on “Arabization”:

            “A small contingent of Arabs from Arabia did indeed
            conquer the country in the seventh century […]
            the Palestinian population soon became Arabized under Arab domination, just as
            earlier it had been Hebraicized, Aramaicized, to some degree even Hellenized.
            It became Arab in a way that it was never to become Latinized or Ottomanized.
            The invaded melted with the invaders. It is ridiculous to call
            the English of today invaders and occupiers, on the grounds that England was
            conquered from Celtic peoples by the Angles, Saxons and Jutes in the fifth and
            sixth centuries. The population was “Anglicized” and nobody suggests that the
            peoples which have more or less preserved the Celtic tongues – the Irish, the
            Welsh or the Bretons – should be regarded as the true natives of Kent or
            Suffolk, with greater titles to these territories than the English who live in
            those counties.”

          • peepsqueek

            Kurd Net Daily Online News: 
”For years the 30 million Kurds spread across those territories have been the world’s largest ethnic group without an independent homeland. Only the Kurds in Iraq, who displaced Iraqi forces in the 1990s when a U.S. and British no-fly zone was in place against Saddam Hussein, have managed to carved out an area of real autonomy.”

            Coptic News: 
”Since Christianity came to Egypt in 57 A.D., we, the Christians of Egypt, have not had conflict with the Jewish people. Copts have been a marginal population held in captivity for sixteen centuries. We constitute the largest non-Arab, non-Moslem minority in the Middle East. The Church of Alexandria, is one of the oldest organizations in the Middle East. Despite this distinguished history, it is a church that has been under siege since the Islamic invasion.”

            Assyrian International News Agency (AINA}:
”Keep in mind that these Christian minorities, the Assyrians, Armenians, Copts, are actually the original inhabitants of these areas with roots going back thousands of years before Christianity. What we’re seeing is a systematic attempt to cleanse the Middle East of its original inhabitants, this is a continuation of the genocide that took place in Ottoman Turkey in 1915.”

          • peepsqueek

            If that is your best academic response, so be it.

        • Du Kium

          As for “they forcibly evicted all Jewish residents who were rightfully there…after the ’67 war, Jews have rightfully started to return.”: I strongly condemn what happened to a few hundreds of Jews in Jordan-occupied-JErusalem, but someone claimed that A half truth is much worse than a whole lie:

          1) The symbolic case of the Gush Etzion block, in many respects unique. The population settled in the block, where a small community of Jews arrived in 1927, was indeed expelled in the course of the 1948 war. However, all the settlements within the block, apart from Hadar Betar and Kfar Etzion, have expanded by more than 100% in the last 20 years. The block includes today also eight unauthorized outposts that further contribute to hinder the ability of Palestinians to access their natural resources. To conflate this massive state-funded project of colonization with “Jews have rightfully started to return” risks to simplify a complex issue.

          2) West Jerusalem represented the 84,13 percent of “Mandate Jerusalem”. Between 1948 and 1967, only 11,48 percent remained in Arab hands, since the remaining 4.39 percent was a buffer zone between the two sectors.
          In the already conquered West Jerusalem the Jews properties did not exceed 30 percent of the total […] Israel justified its conquest of East Jerusalem in 1967 with the fact that between 1948 and 1967 Jews were not allowed to access to the Wailing Wall.
          Israel attributes this ban to Muslim intolerance. Actually this refusal of access, which lasted twenty years, didn’t have any Muslim motivation, as Jews had been given free access to Jerusalem in the previous twelve centuries of Muslim rule of the city, while the same access was forbidden under Christian domination (Byzantines and Crusades as well).
          The issue of the Wailing Wall fell among the consequences of 48’s War. During it Jewish forces occupied 5 mixed cities, 9 fully Arab cities and 500 enterely Arab villages. Afterward Israel razed to the ground 400 of these 500 villages and distributed that land […]. On the other hand, the ethnic cleansing has deprived of their home 750,000 Pals, Christians and Muslims.
          And while between 1948 and 1967 Jews didn’t have access to the Wailing Wall, for those Palestinians refugees and their descendants, now amounting to several millions of human beings, there was and still remains the denial of access to their lands and their homes in Israel

          • peepsqueek

            The current demand that the great grandchildren of refugees be allowed to return to the State of Israel has become a weapon, as an influx of that magnitude would cause the demographic destruction of the Jewish State. This would be in violation of Paragraph 11 of Resolution 194 [1948], that you speak of, which required that those returning should and desiring to “live at peace with their neighbours should be permitted to do so at the EARLIEST PRACTICAL DATE.” The right of return, has now become a weapon for the demographic destruction of Israel, which fits neither the “live at peace” clause nor the “earliest practicable date” clause. There is no practical, let alone moral, way for Israel to accept and enable its own demise. “Practical” does not mean that you can lose several more wars against the Jewish State and then demand the “Right of Return”, after thousands have become millions.

          • Du Kium

            I can write a lot about this. But it’s totally irrelevant in relation to what we were discussing.
            You wrote that “Jews have rightfully started to return” and I answered you providing context (“5 mixed cities, 9 fully Arab cities and 500 enterely Arab villages.
            Afterward Israel razed to the ground 400 of these 500 villages…”) and adding that:
            The symbolic case of the Gush Etzion block, in many respects unique.
            The population settled in the block, where a small community of Jews
            arrived in 1927, was indeed expelled in the course of the 1948 war.
            However, all the settlements within the block, apart from Hadar Betar
            and Kfar Etzion, have expanded by more than 100% in the last 20 years.
            The block includes today also eight unauthorized outposts that further
            contribute to hinder the ability of Palestinians to access their natural
            resources. To conflate this massive state-funded project of
            colonization with “Jews have rightfully started to return” risks to
            simplify a complex issue.

          • peepsqueek

            Your numbers are high, they were very tiny villages that were taken during the confines of war, which Arab States initiated. Israel proper did not have that kind of development at the time to support that many villages. Today 1.5 million Palestinian Arabs live in Israel proper as citizens, on land that hypocritical activists say is ethnically cleansed.

          • Du Kium

            ” was founded not by European refugees, but by a group of old-time families, leaving the overcrowded Jewish Quarter of the Old City of Jerusalem”:
            fully aware of this, and in fact no one complains about Yosef Rivlin &the Nahalat Shiv‘a neighborhood. But what you forget to mention is that the fifth Zionist congress founded in Basel the KKL (Jewish National Fund) with the task of buying land in Palestine, and banning the alienation of this newly acquired area to non-Jews. In the years to follow, the KKL succeeded in buying nine-tenths of the land bought in Palestine by Zionist buyers. In contrast to what happened to the lands owned by PICA (Palestine Jewish colonization association), KKL’s areas were managed in a discriminatory way in relation to the Arab population. This aspect was clearly set out in the third article of the KKL constitution drawn up in Zurich on 14 August 1929: (d) Land is to be acquired as Jewish property and subject to the provisions of Article 10 of this Agreement, the title to the lands acquired is to be taken in the name of the Jewish National Fund, to the end that the same shall be held as the inalienable property of the Jewish people. (e) The Agency shall promote agricultural colonisation based on Jewish labour…

          • Du Kium

            “The Encyclopedaedia Britanica of 1910 gives the population figure as 60,000”,
            yes, and the the first official census carried out in Palestine was conducted by the British authorities in 1922. A total population of 757,182 individuals was found, of whom 590,390 were Muslims, 83,694 Jews and 73,024 Christians. “Most of the land purchases involved large tracts belonging to absentee owners”: you forget to tell us that Despite the efforts of the Zionist organizations and a certain number of individuals and private companies,91 as of December 1946, the year of the last official survey taken on the matter, the amount of ‘redeemed’ soil by the former and the latter was equal to around 6 per cent of the total land subject to the partition.

            “According to the Turkish census of 1875, by that time Jews already constituted a majority of the population of Jerusalem”:
            Jerusalem
            is hardly representative of all Palestine and you are not referring to
            an absolute majority (Christians were mainly Palestinians)

          • Du Kium

            “Most of the land had not be cultivated previously and considered uncultivable”:
            you are referring to a little area that was defined in 1854 “one of the richest districts in the world”. See B. Taylor, Lands of the Saracen, Putnam, New York 1862, p. 99. Taylors: “Our road, next day, lay directly across the Plain of Esdraelon, one of the richest districts in the world. It is now a green sea, covered with fields of wheat and barley, or great grazing tracts, on which multitudes of sheep and goats are wandering. In some respects it reminded me of the Valley of San José, and if I were to liken Palestine to any other country I have seen, it would be California”. Ibid.
            —-
            As for much of the rest of Palestine, British Consul Finn:
            ‘I do not know where in all the Holy Land I have seen such
            excellent agriculture of grain, olive-trees, and orchards of fruits, as here at Ashdod. The fields would do credit to English farming.’ J. Finn, Byeways in Palestine (London: Nisbet, 1868), p. 162.
            ˙—
            Tulkarem-Nablus-Jenin triangle: “The cotton plantations are beautifully clean and orderly and the fields from which grain crops had been reaped, are well defined and carefully cleaned” (Finn 1848)

          • peepsqueek

            Jordan is almost 80% of historic Palestine, much of the geographical area of Palestine was uninhabited, and many of the Muslims and Christians were not necessarily Arabs, they were Turks, Assyrians, Copts, Kurds, Armenian, and others.

            Here are some popular Palestinian Arab surnames, and their meaning in English:

            al-Masri – the Egyptian

            al-Mughrabi – the Moroccan (Mughrabi Quarter is the Moroccan southeast corner of the Old City of Jerusalem)

            al-Djazair – the Algerian

            al-Yamani – the Yemeni

            al-Afghani – the Afghan (meaning Pashtun)

            al-Turki – the Turk

            al-Hindi – the Indian

            al-Hourani – the Hauranite (from southern Syria)

            al-Kurdi – the Kurd

            ‘Al-Filistini’ is a tribal name (nisba) meaning ‘the Palestinian’

            UNRWA definition of a Palestine refugee in 1952: “A Palestine refugee is [a person] whose normal residence was Palestine for a [minimum period of two years] preceding the outbreak of the conflict in 1948 and who, as a result of this conflict has lost both his home and his means of livelihood.”

            The definition of “refugees” omitted the reference to persons of Arab origin in the 1948 General Assembly proposal, and including stateless persons who had been residents of Palestine for a [minimum of two years] preceding the outbreak of the conflict in 1948. Most of the Arab refugees remained in the geographical area of Palestine, or to “Arab” Countries, and all the Jews made to leave Arab Countries went to the tiny Jewish State. Right or wrong, that is documented history. Israel proper today, houses 1.5 million Palestinian Arabs as citizens.

            The point is that the collective Arab Countries that initiated the conflict lost the war, and one tiny Jewish State in the Middle East came into existence.

          • Du Kium

            “Jordan is almost 80% of historic Palestine”: no, it is not. And in fact the Nabi Musa Festival involved almost only people from present-day Israel and Palestinian territories

            Some influential Zionists, including Nahum Sokolow, said that the eastern border of “Erets-Yisra’el” was represented by the Jordan river. Many others claimed a much vaster area.
            Their positions were justified through arguments linked to security and economic aspects, despite the fact that, as noted by Arnold Toynbee in 1918, “Jordan forms a good natural frontier. Nor are there any Jewish agricultural colonies east of the river”.

            The Ottoman authorities used in their official correspondence the
            expression “Arz-i Filistin ve Suriye”, meaning the area to the west of
            the Jordan. For its large Muslim majority, “Filastan” was a land even
            easier to circumscribe. Many classical Islamic sources identified it as “Al Ard al Muqaddasa” (the Holy Land).
            The awareness that Palestine was distinct from Syria, Jordan and Lebanon is said to have always been present in the Arab and Muslim consciousness.

            The 10th century Persian geographer Al Istakhri noted that Palestine stretched “from Rafh (Rafah) to the edge of Al Lajjûn” and “from Yâfâ (Jaffa) to Rîhâ (Jericho)”.

          • Du Kium

            “Here are some popular Palestinian Arab surnames, and their meaning in English”: misleading and simplistic.
            These aspects have little if any meaning meaning if evaluated outside of their peculiar regional context. In Damascus as well as in several other cities in the region it is still possible to encounter plenty of local families with names whose origins show clear links to areas in present-day Israel and the Palestinian territories. This further proves that considering the movements within the broader region as migratory processes among reciprocally “foreign” populations, is a simplistic way to define a reality that was anything but simple. The Palestinian context, in other words, was an integral part of the Arab world without erasing for this its peculiarities. In Adel Manna’s words:

            “A Palestinian who moved to south Lebanon or a Lebanese who moved to Palestine – or a Syrian or a Jordanian, for that matter – is surely not a foreigner because he is part of the culture of the society of Bilad-al-Sham, or Greater Syria, where there were no borders between countries. […] It was common and natural for a Palestinian to go study in Al Azhar for instance, and remain there; or for a Hebronite merchant to go to Cairo and live there; or go to Damascus or other places, whether to study or to live […] This was a natural phenomenon” (Scham et al. 2005, 34).

          • peepsqueek

            Why did you ignore these three current statements I took from others living in the Middle East?

            Kurd Net Daily Online News: 

            “For years the 30 million Kurds spread across those territories have been the world’s largest ethnic group without an independent homeland. Only the Kurds in Iraq, who displaced Iraqi forces in the 1990s when a U.S. and British no-fly zone was in place against Saddam Hussein, have managed to carved out an area of real autonomy.”

            Coptic News:
            
”Since Christianity came to Egypt in 57 A.D., we, the Christians of Egypt, have not had conflict with the Jewish people. Copts have been a marginal population held in captivity for sixteen centuries. We constitute the largest non-Arab, non-Moslem minority in the Middle East. The Church of Alexandria, is one of the oldest organizations in the Middle East. Despite this distinguished history, it is a church that has been under siege since the Islamic invasion.”

            Assyrian International News Agency (AINA}:
            
”Keep in mind that these Christian minorities, the Assyrians, Armenians, Copts, are actually the original inhabitants of these areas with roots going back thousands of years before Christianity. What we’re seeing is a systematic attempt to cleanse the Middle East of its original inhabitants, this is a continuation of the genocide that took place in Ottoman Turkey in 1915.”

          • Du Kium

            “initiated the conflict lost the war”:
            again, simplistic. 1947 is just the last chapter of an aggression that started many decades before. Take for example the year 1907, few months before jaffa clashes, when the VIII zionist congress sent Arthur Ruppin with the aim to create “a Jewish milieu and of a closed Jewish economy, in which producers, consumers and middlemen shall all be Jewish”.
            The ‘avoda ivrit’ – ‘jewish labour’ only – logic excluded the local majority: you conflate who did what.

          • peepsqueek

            Everything prior to WWI had to be approved by Ottoman Islamic Courts. How did Arabs acquire most of the Middle East and 22 independent States? Are you really looking for balance in the Middle East, or just to target one people?

        • Du Kium

          1. There is nothing “divinely inspired”: religion is a private matter
          between you and your god and not a political tool for replacing a human experience with (pseudo)religious narratives that pretend to be history.
          2. Sacred scriptures [Jushua 10.13] tells us that Joshua commanded the sun to stand still, and not the earth: should we question sacred scriptures or foster the claim that the Sun is moving around the earth?
          3. the earliest known Mesopotamian people, the Sumerians (modern Iraqis) were not Semites. Exactly like Philistines.
          4. Islamic scholars (I personally oppose every religion, or, to say
          better, I believe in a mix of about 7 religions)largely agree that any
          promise would not be unconditional but clearly bounded to the fact that jews were obliged to accept Allah’s commands & defend their land right but without unjust retaliation or aggression to other non Jews land residents. See Allah warning to Israelis Q 17;8. Let me stress once again that religion should not have any whatsoever role (and many scholars disagree on where the “Holy Land” was exactly placed). And let me repeat that the numerous archaeological expeditions carried out over decades in Ashkelon have
          confirmed that it was never conquered by the
          ancient Israelites. And even if one assumes that there was a conquest, the occupation of an area for a few years does not mean that it represented part of a larger “historic Jewish homeland”. Otherwise, the many Philistine raids and sometimes occupations of Israelite towns as far east as the Jordan River valley would also make these areas “less Israelite”.

          • peepsqueek

            From your post– “Religion is a private matter between you and your god and not a political tool….”

            Most Muslim Countries, Palestinian territory, and all Middle East Countries, with the exception of Israel, are signatories to the Cairo Declaration of Human Rights:

            Article 19: “There shall be NO crime or punishment EXCEPT as provided for in the Sharia.”

            Article 24 : “All the rights and freedoms stipulated in this Declaration are subject to the Islamic Sharia.”

            Article 25: “The Islamic Sharia is the ONLY source of reference for the explanation or clarification of ANY of the articles of this Declaration.”

        • Ghazi

          Sorry to burst your convenient self-serving fantasy, but the Bible is not a title deed, it’s a 2000 year old religious text. It has absolutely no bearing on international law.

          • peepsqueek

            The Bible is much older than 2,000 years, and I am guessing it is full of fantasy and fictitious stories, and I agree that religious texts should have no bearing of international law, yet the banner of Islam flies over 99.9% of the Middle East land mass, and they are all members of the 57 Muslim States that belong to Organization of Islamic Cooperation, which is the largest voting bloc at the UN General Assembly.

            Even the Qur’an prophesied that the children of Israel will return to the land of Israel. Sorry to burst your fantasy, but I did not write this stuff or claim it to be the word of God/Allah.

            Israel’s international “birth certificate” is validated by all three ancient Biblical texts- Jewish, Christian, and Muslim; Jewish settlement from the time of Joshua onward, and speaking of ‘international law’ the Balfour Declaration of 1917; the San Remo resolution; the League of Nations Mandate, which incorporated the Balfour Declaration; the United Nations Partition Resolution of 1947; then Israel became an independent state in 1948; then Israel’s admission to the UN in 1949, and the recognition of Israel by most other states. Israel has diplomatic relations with a 180 Countries and does business with most of them. Also, I believe that Jews have earned the right to never again rely on international opinions for their protection.

    • Ghazi

      You’re a liar. The Palestinian have not stated that they want a state free of Jews.

      Google: ‘Palestinians: Yes to Jews, no to settlers in our state’ – The Times of Israel (January 27, 2014)

      • peepsqueek

        You have to learn to separate BS from reality. Calling me a “liar” won’t changes the known facts.

        When Egypt controlled Gaza, Jews were removed from Gaza before there was a single Israeli settlement,

        When Jordan controlled the West Bank, Jews were removed before there was a single Israeli settlement.

        Israel was a constant target for terrorism prior to 1967 before their was as single settlement in the West Bank or Gaza.

        11 Years ago, every Jew(s) was removed from Gaza, and Hamas rockets rained down on Israel within weeks.

        Hypocritical activists are always saying it would be better for peace if the West Bank were free of Jews. I am glad to know that you disagree with them? – sarcasm intended