Portuguese / Spanish / English

Middle East Near You

Queues of Algerian students seeking migration to France upset observers

Algerian students are seen queuing up in front of the French Institute in Algeria with the hope of emigrating [File photo]

A photo of Algerian students hoping to immigrate to France has raised questions regarding the dissatisfaction Algerian citizens, international observers and several Arab politicians. The photo depicts students queuing up in front of the French Institute in Algeria with the hope of emigrating.

Algerian International Human Rights Watchdog, Anouar Malik responded to the photo: “This is happening at the time of the commemoration of the revolution against the French occupier.”

“If there were no corruption, lack of development programs and the assignment of responsibilities to non-specialized people, the Algerian youth of this country, which is rich in resources, would not have fled their homeland in any way, even with illegal immigration death boats,” he said.

He added: Only a fool would believe corrupt officials who destroyed Algeria, looted its resources, damaged the future of its people, and then accuse every honest person, who exposes their corruption and opposes them, of conspiring against his homeland.

Read: Calls for France to apologise for massacre of Algerians in Paris

Abbas al-Dhalaei, a Yemeni writer and journalist, commented on the photo of Algerian students’ queues, saying: “Arab countries have become repellent environments to their people, and migration to the West has turned from a case to a phenomenon and a goal for young people and different working staffs.”

He concluded his comment by saying: “dictatorships have destroyed dreams.”

Sam al-Ghabari, advisor to the Yemeni Prime Minister, posted on his Twitter page: “There are things that are not valid in republics. They have not resolved the issue of power. Thus, this resulted in corrupt and weak republics in which there is no good for themselves, their people, and their form.

Categories
AfricaAlgeriaEurope & RussiaFranceMiddle EastNewsYemen
Show Comments
Show Comments