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Rights group warns of medicine shortage in Gaza hospitals

Medication supplies in the Gaza Strip have reached dangerously low levels after the decision was made to stop providing hospital and health centres, on 23 May, 2017 [Mohammed Asad/Middle East Monitor]
Medication supplies in the Gaza Strip have reached dangerously low levels after the decision was made to stop providing hospital and health centres, on 23 May, 2017 [Mohammed Asad/Middle East Monitor]

The Palestinian Centre for Human Rights (PCHR) has said it is “deeply concerned” over what it describes as “the severe lack of medicines and medical consumables” in hospitals in the Israeli-occupied Gaza Strip.

According to PCHR, the conditions of patients in the Gaza Strip could well “deteriorate due to the shortage of medicine and periodic medications”.

#EndGazaSiege

The group urged the Palestinian Authority’s Ministry of Health in Ramallah “to guarantee the free and secure flow of all consignments of medicines and needed medical supplies for the health facilities in the Gaza Strip”.

Moneer al-Bursh, Director General of Pharmacy in the Gaza-based Health Ministry, told PCHR that the blockaded enclave “is going through a rapid collapse in the health system as the Ministry of Health in Ramallah has stopped supplying medicines and medical consumables”.

PCHR is calling upon President Mahmoud Abbas “to immediately intervene” to ensure the supply of “medications and medical consignment into the Gaza Strip”, and urged the national unity government “to take necessary measures” to restock Gaza’s hospitals.

Read: Gaza patients’ lives at risk due to medical shortages says UN/strong>

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  • Eduardo Pinha

    Israel does not occupy Gaza. Israel does not blockade medicines. The only culprit is the PA.

  • Was Gaza better or worse off under Israeli rule?

  • kirby1

    The Palestinians have only themselves to blame for putting Hamas into power.

    Under Israel authority:
    a. Life expectancy increased from 48 to 82,
    b. Infant mortality decreased by 75%,
    c. Employment increased significantly,
    d. Average income increased significantly, more than in adjacent Arab states.
    e. Per capital GDP increased significantly, more than in adjacent Arab states except for those with oil income.
    f. The number of Arab houses with running water increased significantly,
    g. The number of Arab houses with electricity increased significantly,
    h. The number of Arab homes cooking with electricity and gas increased significantly
    i. Before the Israeli liberation, the number of colleges or universities was zero, afterwards seven.
    j. Literacy increased significantly.

    In the economic sphere, most of this progress was the result of access to the far larger and more advanced Israeli economy: the number of Palestinians working in Israel rose from zero in 1967 to 66,000 in 1975 and 109,000 by 1986, accounting for 35 percent of the employed population of the West Bank and 45 percent in Gaza. Close to 2,000 industrial plants, employing almost half of the work force, were established in the territories under Israeli rule.

    During the 1970’s, the West Bank and Gaza constituted the fourth fastest-growing economy in the world — ahead of such “wonders” as Singapore, Hong Kong, and Korea, and substantially ahead of Israel itself. Although GNP per capita grew somewhat more slowly, the rate was still high by international standards, with per-capita GNP expanding tenfold between 1968 and 1991 from $165 to $1,715 (compared with Jordan’s $1,050, Egypt’s $600, Turkey’s $1,630, and Tunisia’s $1,440). By 1999, Palestinian per-capita income was nearly double Syria’s, more than four times Yemen’s, and 10 percent higher than Jordan’s (one of the better off Arab states). Only the oil-rich Gulf states and Lebanon were more affluent.