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Sudan Muslim Brotherhood 'supports' military council, opposition agreement

Sudanese people, member of Islamic groups, attend a march to demonstrate in support of transitional military council in front of presidential palace in Khartoum, Sudan on 31 May 2019. [Mahmoud Hjaj - Anadolu Agency]
Sudanese people, member of Islamic groups, attend a march to demonstrate in support of transitional military council in front of presidential palace in Khartoum, Sudan on 31 May 2019. [Mahmoud Hjaj - Anadolu Agency]

The Observer-General of Sudan's Muslim Brotherhood, Awadallah Hassan, yesterday announced his support for the agreement reached between the ruling military council and the Sudanese opposition.

Sudan News Agency (SUNA) quoted Hassan as saying: "We support any agreement that preserves the country and we are optimistic that the future will be better if people agree to respect democracy and renounce the method of exclusion and secret agendas."

"We will peacefully extend our hands to cooperate with everyone in order to establish a country that we will be proud of," Hassan added.

The Observer-General called on all parties to promptly find solutions to the problems facing the country and make concessions for the sake of security and stability. He called for the participation of all parties to provide opinions and ideas to contribute to this goal.

READ: Arab League delegation in Khartoum to help reach national agreement

The eastern Sudanese city of Al-Qadarif and the central city of Madani have witnessed "marches of joy" following the announcement of an agreement between the military council and the Forces of Freedom and Change earlier this week.

Yesterday morning, hundreds of people marched in several neighbourhoods of the capital Khartoum, celebrating the signing of an agreement to form a sovereign council and a transitional civilian government.

The agreement has been seen as a breakthrough after direct negotiations between the conflicting parties collapsed in May, with both parties accusing the other of wishing to dominate the bodies of the authority proposed for the transitional period.

Sudan has been witnessing a power struggle since the army's ousting of President Omar Al-Bashir from the presidency on 11 April, after widespread public protests started in late 2018 denouncing the country's deteriorating economic situation.

OPINION: Sudan's 'revolution' was a military coup in disguise

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