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Turkey, Russia discuss joint patrols in Syria

Armoured vehicles of Turkish Armed Forces conduct first independent but coordinated patrol with Russian Armed Forces in order to achieve ceasefire, provide stability in the Tal Rıfat region in Syria on March 26, 2019. [Defense Ministry of Turkey / Handout - Anadolu Agency]
Armoured vehicles of Turkish Armed Forces conduct their first independent but coordinated patrol with Russian Armed Forces in order to achieve ceasefire, in the Tal Rıfat region in Syria on March 26, 2019. [Defense Ministry of Turkey / Handout - Anadolu Agency]

Turkey and Russia are discussing possible joint patrols as one way to reach a deal to halt fighting and stem an exodus of civilians in Syria’s Idlib region, a Turkish official said today, a day after Ankara threatened military action to push back Syrian government forces, Reuters reported.

Turkey and Russia, which back opposing sides in the nine-year-old conflict, have failed to reach an agreement after two rounds of talks in the last two weeks.

A Syrian government offensive to eradicate the last opposition strongholds in north-west Syria has led to some of the most serious confrontations yet between NATO member Ankara and Damascus, and prompted Turkey to send thousands of troops and convoys of heavy weapons to the border area.

Turkey has taken in about 3.7 million Syrian refugees since the war started and says it cannot handle any more over its border, which is now closed. The United Nations says more than 900,000 people, mostly women and children, have fled their homes in Idlib since early December.

The Syrian regime and its Russian allies are like a pack of hyenas attacking Idlib

The Turkish official said the talks with Russia had not been “completely without a result”. The discussions had moved forward but reached no final decision, said the official, speaking on condition of anonymity.

“Russia has maintained its position that Turkey withdraws from Idlib and evacuates its observation posts since the beginning. Withdrawing from Idlib or evacuating the observation posts is not on the agenda.”

“Various exercises are being discussed. For example, ensuring security through Turkish and Russian security officials and holding joint patrols could be possible,” the official said, adding that both Ankara and Moscow expected their presidents to “end the issue”.

Turkey, which backs rebels trying to oust Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, has threatened to use military power to drive back Syrian forces advancing in Idlib unless they withdraw by the end of the month. On Wednesday, President Tayyip Erdogan said a Turkish offensive into Idlib was a “matter of time”.

Ankara and Moscow have accused each other of flouting a 2018 de-escalation agreement that allowed Turkey and Russia to set up military observation posts in Idlib.

Turkey has said some of its posts in Idlib were surrounded by Syrian government forces, but that it would not evacuate the positions or move them.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan yesterday told members of his Justice and Development Party that an operation in Idlib is “imminent”, adding “We are counting down, we are making our final warnings”.

Idlib could be the greatest international failure in human history, says Turkish official

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Europe & RussiaMiddle EastNewsRussiaSyriaTurkey
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