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Turkey concerned by unrest in Somalia as election delayed

MOGADISHU, SOMALIA - FEBRUARY 13: Security forces take measures on the scene of a huge car bomb blast that targeted a security checkpoint near the Somali parliament headquarters in the capital Mogadishu on February 13, 2021. At least seven people were wounded when a suicide car bomb blast targeted a security checkpoint near the Somali parliament headquarters in the capital Mogadishu on Saturday, police said. "A suicide bomber driving a Toyota Noah [vehicle] drove past a security checkpoint in the Dabka area, forcing police to open fire. At least seven people were wounded, eight cars and nine rickshaws were destroyed in the morning bombing in Mogadishu," Somali police said in a statement. ( Sadak Mohamed - Anadolu Agency )
Security forces take measures on the scene of a huge car bomb blast that targeted a security checkpoint near the Somali parliament headquarters in the capital Mogadishu on February 13, 2021 [Sadak Mohamed - Anadolu Agency]

Turkish yesterday expressed concern over the rise in unrest in Somalia as a result of the delay in holding elections which was due to be held on 8 February.

In a statement, the Foreign Ministry said: "We are concerned about the recent negative developments arising from the dispute over the election process in Somalia."

"It is important that all parties act with common sense by avoiding steps that may lead to violence, and that the Federal Government and Federal Member States' Leaders come together and try to resolve disputes with an inclusive and constructive dialogue on the basis of the agreement reached on 17 September 2020," the statement added.

Somalia is facing a leadership crisis as the president's term has ended and there is no clear path toward elections. An alliance of opposition parties has declared they no longer recognise the president's authority and vowed to launch protests.

Somalia: Armed clashes as opposition presidential candidates stage rally

Yesterday, the country's Ministry of Foreign Affairs accused "external forces" for contributing to the problems. It went on to blame a foreign country for making "misinformed and misleading statements that disregard the facts and at times appear to be supporting insurrection", the Independent newspaper reported, in remarks thought to have been aimed at the UAE which had criticised the recent violence in the country.

At least four people, including soldiers, were killed and three more wounded in a gunfight between military personnel and opposition members near the presidential palace on Friday.

Meanwhile, foreign institutions including the United Nations urged the country's divided political leadership to urgently resume dialogue so that elections can take place as soon as possible.

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AfricaEurope & RussiaMiddle EastNewsSomaliaTurkeyUAE
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