Portuguese / Spanish / English

Bee venom: Sudan's alternative medicine

From inside his small shop in souk in the centre of the Sudanese capital, Khartoum, Abdullah Al-Sarraj was able to make bee stings an "effective and rapid treatment" for people who are suffering from chronic diseases

From inside his small shop in souk in the centre of the Sudanese capital, Khartoum, Abdullah Al-Sarraj was able to make bee stings an "effective and rapid treatment" for people who are suffering from chronic diseases.

In the shop with its own distinctive buzz, Hamza grabs forceps and gets to work with the bees. He says treatment by bees was mentioned in the Quran and everything that comes from the stomach of bees is healing, including the honey and wax, but he says even the venom from their sting can heal.

He says he uses the bees' sting to treat ailments by inserting them into specific sites on a patients' body depending on the disease being treated, adding that the "stings relax the nerves".
Al-Sarraj is considered one of the oldest therapists of this type of alternative medicine in Khartoum.

Bee venom contains "a treatment for about 140 diseases, because it contains organic, non-chemical medicinal substances that do not cause side effects," says Al-Sarraj.
This information has not been confirmed by impartial medical sources.

According to Al-Sarraj, bee venom is a "liquid secretion emanating from acidic glands located at the back of the bee's body."
He stated that they continued to use it to treat malaria. "We treat rheumatism, dryness of the fluid between joints and kneecaps, migraines, irritable bowels and tonsillitis."

READ: Gaza beekeepers who survived blockade struggle with unstable climate

Categories
AfricaNewsSudanVideos & Photo Stories
Show Comments
International perspectives on apartheid and decolonization in Palestine
Show Comments