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Creating new perspectives since 2009

 

Mhamed Krichen

Mhamed Krichen is a Doha-based anchor and programme host for Al Jazeera.

 

Items by Mhamed Krichen

  • There’s a slight but important shift in the Israeli media

    Israel and its people remained deaf to reason for more than a month after 7 October, during which no one dared to talk about anything other than an overwhelming desire for more revenge against the Palestinians in the Gaza Strip. It did not matter whether it was civilian infrastructure...

  • The importance of documenting all of Israel’s crimes

    Just as the Jews have never forgotten for a single day what happened to them in the Holocaust in Europe during the time of the Nazis – and this is their right and duty – we must never forget what their descendants did, and are still doing, to the...

  • A new young generation in the West

    “You don’t need to be Palestinian, Arab or Muslim to stand in solidarity with the Palestinian cause and denounce the Israeli occupation.” This is in response to what US President, Joe Biden, said one day that a person does not need to be Jewish in order to be a...

  • Why do you hate us this much?

    The level of Western hypocrisy when dealing with our issues has become very high, along with the inflammatory exposure of the shaken standards and values and the lack of respect for the humanity of “others”, even reaching the level of them being treated as another species that is undeserving...

  • Tunisia fierce attack on the media

    Almost all freedoms in Tunisia have evaporated, leaving only the freedom of the media, but today it is in severe distress. President Kais Saied has repeatedly criticised the media in his country on several occasions. The issue began with hints here and there, but gradually turned into something resembling...

  • When will there be a response to any popular movement in the Arab world?

    In Lebanon, the peaceful movement, as part of the Arab Spring movements, subsided after it hit a sectarian system that is calcified and was eroded by corruption. As for Algeria, it was satisfied with some gains which, despite their importance, are much less than the hopes which existed when...

  • Tunisia and the IMF: what is really the alternative?

    When Tunisian President Kais Saied was asked what the alternative is after he said that he rejects the conditions for a $1.9 billion loan from the International Monetary Fund, he replied, “We must rely on ourselves.” The IMF loan would have been used to bridge the gap in the...

  • Why is Putin getting an ICC arrest warrant, but not Assad?

    The prosecutor of the International Criminal Court once proposed to issue an international arrest warrant for Syrian President Bashar Al-Assad, noting that there was a “strong case” against him. In an interview with the Canadian national broadcaster CBC, he said that the implementation of this warrant could be entrusted...

  • What is the solution for Tunisia?

    If you ask opponents of Tunisian President Kais Saied what the solution is for the country, they will answer without hesitation: Kais Saied must step down. If you ask them how this will happen, they have no specific answer. The president’s supporters will answer the same question by saying...

  • Is Tunisia chasing its people away?

    Many people in Tunisia are looking for an opportunity to leave the country. Some opt for the dramatic but illegal way using unseaworthy boats that may or may not reach the other side of the Mediterranean; others continue to look tirelessly for another way. Diaspora Tunisians are not a...

  • A referendum on a new constitution is not the medicine that Tunisia needs

    One of the most prominent officials close to the president of Tunisia described the latter’s approach to the current situation in his country thus: “It is as if you are giving an aspirin to a person with cancer.” The former dean of the Faculty of Law at the University...

  • Libya: Confused elections

    Saif al-Islam Gaddafi and Khalifa Haftar are running for the presidential elections scheduled for 24 December, and the controversy that followed added nothing else to the very complex scene in Libya, other than fuelling the fear that these elections will not be a way out of the deepening crisis...

  • To know what happens when presidents hinder state affairs, ask Lebanon and Tunisia

    In Lebanon, they have been waiting for six months; in Tunisia it’s three months. The Lebanese are waiting for a new government, while the Tunisians are waiting for eleven new ministers to assume their duties after being given parliament’s approval. Lebanon has not benefitted from a government, and Tunisia...

  • Sudan is bored with Al-Bashir

    They never learn from others’ mistakes. This seems to be how presidents act; the latest of whom is Sudanese President Omar Al-Bashir who is facing angry protests in which a number of people have been killed and others injured. In spite of this, he is still using methods that...

  • The Gulf: between normalisation and dismemberment

    From Khartoum, where the Arab summit in late August 1967 announced its Three No’s: no peace with Israel, no recognition of Israel, and no negotiations with it, a leader of Sudan’s National Congress, the ruling party, confirmed the validity of the news reported by Israeli radio regarding Israeli Prime...

  • The death penalty for journalists in Egypt

    Is this how verdicts in Egypt have evolved? We have gone from jailing them to sentencing them to death! It is not enough that 13 journalists were killed in the last three years and that more than 90 were imprisoned. Now we have come to find that three journalists,...