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Yemen gov't demands US pressure Houthis to end Taiz siege

Damaged vehicles are seen after an attack carried out with unmanned aerial vehicle (uav) by the Iranian-backed Houthis in Taizi, Yemen on May 04, 2022. [Abdulnasser Alseddik - Anadolu Agency]
Damaged vehicles are seen after an attack carried out with unmanned aerial vehicle (uav) by the Iranian-backed Houthis in Taizi, Yemen on May 04, 2022. [Abdulnasser Alseddik - Anadolu Agency]

The Yemeni government yesterday demanded the United States pressure the Houthi group in order to lift the siege imposed on the city of Taiz, Anadolu news agency reported.

This came during a meeting between Yemeni Foreign Minister Ahmed Awad Bin Mubarak with US Secretary of State Antony Blinken in Washington, DC, according to a statement issued by the Yemeni government.

The statement said the meeting "discussed ways to strengthen and develop bilateral relations between the two friendly countries as well as developments in Yemen and the peace process in Yemen."

"While the government was keen to do everything possible to make the truce a success and implement its commitments, which have recently culminated in restoring flights to and from Sanaa airport, the Houthi militias are still procrastinating in implementing their commitments, especially those related to lifting the siege imposed on the city of Taiz, facilitating the movement of citizens and alleviating the humanitarian crisis in the besieged governorate for more than 7 years," the statement quoted Bin Mubarak as saying.

READ: Houthis offer a new peace initiative to end the war in Taiz

The minister called on the United States and the international community to "do their duty towards the besieged civilians in the city of Taiz and to pressure the Houthi militias to open the city's crossings."

Bin Mubarak stressed that although the truce stopped hostilities and alleviated the suffering of the people, the Houthis' lack of seriousness in adhering to it and their continued violations put a real test before the UN and the international community.

There was no immediate comment from the Houthis on Bin Mubarak's statements.

On 1 April, the UN envoy to Yemen, Hans Grundberg, announced that the parties to the conflict had agreed to a two-month "extendable" truce, which began the following day. The Saudi-led Arab coalition, pro-government forces and the Houthis welcomed the truce.

The most prominent provision of the truce is restoring commercial flights through Sanaa airport and the opening of roads in the city of Taiz.

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