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Saudi newspaper calls for replacing Yemen's Hadi government

UN envoy for Yemen Martin Griffiths [File photo]
UN envoy for Yemen, Martin Griffiths [Twitter]

A writer for the Saudi newspaper Okaz has called for an alternative government to replace the UN-backed government of exiled Yemeni President Abd Rabbuh Mansur Hadi who is currently based in the Saudi capital Riyadh.

In an article entitled "Can Yemen be saved by such a government?" Hammoud Abu Taleb opined on Friday that Hadi's government "residing abroad" continues to be faced with challenges and discontent in addition to questionable loyalties of some within Hadi's administration who are "colluding with its enemies of the coalition", in reference to the rival Sanaa-based government established by the Houthi movement.

READ: Saudi coalition airstrike 'mistakenly' kills pro-Hadi soldiers

As a result, Hadi's government, according to Abu Taleb has proven itself to be a "burden" on Yemen and its supporters. As such, the author argues that "it is absurd to rely on its members, who are distributed between capitals, and conspire against the alliance from inside their luxury hotels."

Although he did not elaborate in detail, Abu Taleb cited recent events confirming his suspicions, which leaves some members of the internationally-recognised government not deserving financial, military nor diplomatic aid from the Arab coalition and in particular the Saudi government which supports it.

UN Envoy for Yemen, Martin Griffiths, yesterday arrived in Sanaa International Airport for the second visit in a week. Uprising Today reported that Griffiths will again be meeting with leaders of the Houthi movement and officials in the National Salvation Government (NSG), which controls much of the north including Yemen's capital, to discuss recent military escalations in Al-Jawf and Marib provinces.

READ: Houthi-backed president meets with UN envoy to Yemen

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