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Tunisia Ennahda party calls to end 'exceptional measures'

Kais Saied, Tunisia's president in Brussels, Belgium, 4 June 2021 [Dursun Aydemir/Anadolu/Bloomberg/Getty Images]
Kais Saied, Tunisia's president in Brussels, Belgium, 4 June 2021 [Dursun Aydemir/Anadolu/Bloomberg/Getty Images]

Tunisia's Ennahda party yesterday called to put an end to the "exceptional measures", announced by President Kais Saied in late July, saying they have damaged Tunisia's gains and reputation after the revolution.

"The exceptional measures rejected the principle of participation in finding solutions to the current political crisis and a return to constitutional legitimacy," the party said in a statement on behalf of its leader and Parliament Speaker, Rashid Ghannouchi.

The statement stressed on the need to "resume parliamentary activity in order to provide the legal conditions for the government, including approving the state budget and the Finance Law in accordance with the law and the constitution."

It also denounced "the media blackout on the economic and financial situation and the absence of data on the draft budget 2022" and "the supplementary budget law for 2021," describing it as a blow to the rights of citizens and media professionals to discuss various options and programmes.

The party called to release all detained journalists and parliamentarians, out of respect for the principles of freedom of expression and the media.

Tunisia's new interior minister: We will not allow anyone to harm the State's prestige

On 25 July, Tunisian President Kais Saied cited Article 80 of the constitution to dismiss Prime Minister Hicham Mechichi, freeze the work of parliament for 30 days, lift the immunity of ministers, and appoint himself as head of the executive authority until the formation of a new government.

This comes after violent protests broke out in several Tunisian cities criticising the government's handling of the economy and the coronavirus. Demonstrators had called for parliament to be dissolved.

The majority of the country's political parties slammed the move as a "coup against the constitution" and the achievements of the 2011 revolution.

He appointed prime minister on 29 September and a new government was formed.

Is Tunisia's state of emergency being used to restrict freedoms? - Cartoon [Sabaaneh/MiddleEastMonitor]

Is Tunisia's state of emergency being used to restrict freedoms? – Cartoon [Sabaaneh/Middle East Monitor]

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