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CIA apologises to Turkey over ‘false claims’ of links to Daesh

In early 2015, the CIA claimed that Turkey was smuggling Daesh's oil through a processing facility in Kilis, Turkey
Iraqi boy captures the fire fighters attempt to extinguish the fire on the oil wells which was caused by Daesh terrorists on 2 November 2016 [Yunus Keleş/Anadolu Agency]
Iraqi boy captures the fire fighters attempt to extinguish the fire on the oil wells which was caused by Daesh terrorists on 2 November 2016 [Yunus Keleş/Anadolu Agency]

Diplomatic sources said that the United States main intelligence service, the CIA, had apologised to Turkey in a written statement for making “false claims” about alleged oil trading between Turkey and Daesh, Turkish newspaper Daily Sabah reported yesterday.

The Turkish newspaper said that high-level Turkish diplomatic sources said that the CIA and the US Secretary of State John Kerry had apologised to Turkey following a report provided by the Turkish intelligence service which proved that the US claims were wrong in early 2015.

According to Daily Sabaha, Turkish National Intelligence Agency (MIT) officials revealed that the geographic locations in the document that allegedly showed where Daesh’s oil trade was conducted in Turkey in fact showed an asphalt plant in Kilis in southeast Turkey.

Following the MIT investigation of the CIA’s documents, the CIA apologised for the mistaken allegations at the end of 2015. “We have seen no evidence to support such an accusation. Turkey plays a vital role in the counter-ISIL coalition,” a statement by the CIA said, using another acronym for Daesh.

Although Turkey is a member of the US-led anti-Daesh coalition, allegations claiming that Turkey has been smuggling oil with Daesh take place in the international press from time to time.

Russia attempted to take advantage of these false claims about Daesh trading with Turkey, after Ankara shot down two of Moscow’s pilots last year.

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