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Turkish burger rebranded as 'Greek' in Saudi Arabia

A fast-food truck in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia on 5 July 2018 [FAYEZ NURELDINE/AFP/Getty Images]
A fast-food truck in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia on 5 July 2018 [FAYEZ NURELDINE/AFP/Getty Images]

Following calls for businesses in Saudi Arabia to boycott Turkish products amid deteriorating ties between the two countries, a fast food chain has announced that it has rebranded its Turkish burger as "Greek", and also reduced the price.

Herfy's launched the Turkish burger back in 2016 "in order to develop and diversify its menu of meals and constantly innovate new products to suit all tastes." It was promoted with an Ottoman-style fez over a black moustache.

However, there has been growing pressure on Saudi businesses to boycott Turkish and Turkey-related products. Although the move is reportedly unofficial, some retail outlets are displaying signs urging customers not to buy Turkish goods.

READ: Report: Saudi Arabia receives only 1.8% of Turkey exports 

According to the Daily Sabah, Danube Supermarkets, Tamimi Markets, Othaim Markets and Panda Retail Company have all issued statements announcing that they will stop carrying Turkish goods once existing stocks are sold off.

On Sunday, Herfy's official Twitter account stated that it endorsed the Boycott Turkish Products campaign. The company described this as, "Our duty towards our great homeland."

Riyadh and Ankara have drifted apart over the past few years due to ideological and geopolitical differences. Relations reached a low point with the murder of Saudi dissident journalist Jamal Khashoggi at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul in October 2018.

Earlier this week it was reported that Hatice Cengiz, Khashoggi's fiancée, has filed a lawsuit at a US court against Saudi Crown Prince Mohammad Bin Salman and other senior Saudi officials allegedly implicated in the murder.

READ: Turkey may have reclaimed the leadership of Sunni Islam from Saudi Arabia

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Europe & RussiaGreeceMiddle EastNewsSaudi ArabiaTurkey
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