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Iran warns Israel of major price to pay if it attacks nuclear facilities

General Ali Shamkhani the secretary of the Supreme National Security Council of Iran photographed in its headquarters on December 17, 2014 in Tehran, Iran [Kaveh Kazemi/Getty Images]
General Ali Shamkhani the secretary of the Supreme National Security Council of Iran photographed in its headquarters on December 17, 2014 in Tehran, Iran [Kaveh Kazemi/Getty Images]

Iran has warned Israel that it will pay a huge price if it dares to attack the country, as tensions increase over Tehran's alleged development of nuclear weapons and the breakdown of talks.

The Secretary of Iran's Supreme National Security Council, Ali Shamkhani, yesterday warned in a tweet that "Instead of allocating [a] $1.5 billion budget for atrocities against Iran, the Zionist regime should focus on providing tens of thousands of billions of dollars funding to repair the damage that is going to be caused by Iran's shocking response."

Shamkhani was referring to Tel Aviv's approval, last week, of $1.5 billion in funding to prepare for a possible attack on Iran's nuclear facilities. This major funding budget reportedly consists of capabilities including aircraft, intelligence-gathering drones, and customised weapons to strike heavily-fortified underground nuclear facilities.

Although the official did not release any details on what Iran's exact response would be, or what form it would come in, the country possesses a number of ballistic and cruise missiles apparently capable of reaching Israel.

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It is also entirely capable of carrying out cyberattacks on Israeli facilities, as was seen in a myriad of such attacks on Israeli railway stations, websites, and hospitals last year and this year. It has been predicted that a targeted and sustained series of cyberattacks could seriously hinder the Israeli economy, which is reportedly not ready for such an event.

The possibility of a direct Israeli attack on Iran's nuclear sites and facilities have seemed increasingly likely over the past few months, with the ongoing negotiations between the United States and Iran, so far, bearing no positive result.

It has reportedly led the US to potentially consider other options, with US Secretary of State, Antony Blinken, telling his Israeli counterpart, Yair Lapid, earlier this month that "every option" remains on the table.

Last week, Israel's Finance Minister, Avigdor Lieberman, also expressed his belief that a conflict with Iran is inevitable, and that a pre-emptive attack is the best way to prevent Tehran from developing nuclear weapons.

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