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‘Return to the Mount’ activists seek destruction of Al-Aqsa

Extremist Likud MK Yehuda Glick [File photo]
Extremist Likud MK Yehuda Glick [File photo]

“Return to the Mount” is a group of radical, right-wing Jewish activists, whose members, according to Haaretz, “are identified with the far-right Kach movement founded by the late Rabbi Meir Kahane.” They are part of a growing tide of “Temple Mount” activism, which ultimately aims to destroy the Al-Aqsa Mosque compound and replace it with a Jewish temple. The following text is an abridged version of an article published by Israeli news site Walla! on 23 October, translated for MEMO.

The Hozrim Lahar (Return to the [Temple] Mount) movement, which strives to promote the renewed construction of the [Jewish] temple and the destruction of the mosques on Temple Mount, subscribes to an extreme ideology and its activists may “bring about the conflagration of an extensive blaze on nationalistic grounds to the extent of bodily harm” – This was stated this week for the first time by the Israeli Supreme Court. This strict definition originates in a ruling which rejected a petition by two key activists in the movement, chairperson Raphael Moris and coordinator Yair Kehati.

In the beginning of October, restraining orders were issued against the two, banning their entry to Jerusalem during the holiday period. The orders were issued by the Shabak, based on the [British Mandatory] Emergency Regulations (1945) for the purpose of “ensuring state security, the safety of the public and the maintenance of public order.” In the petition, filed via Attorney Yitzhak Bam, the two asked not only for the annulment of the orders, but also for a court statement so as to past cases in which such orders have been used.

“We should conduct our affairs as an independent state and do what’s right for us… the Arabs will understand the hint and whoever accepts us will stay and whoever does not will leave, just like what happened in ‘48.”

Hozrim Lahar is a fairly new movement which focuses on the Temple Mount and raising awareness of the need and the demand for the construction of the Third Temple. The organisation was established around four years ago as the initiative of several Hilltop Youths who were active in the advancement of settlements in Judea and Samaria [the West Bank], and decided to channel their energy to the Temple issue.

“It actually came from my wife, and I too joined in,” said Moris, aged 21. “We began to feel out the [situation on the] ground and we noticed that many people are talking about the Temple and Temple Mount but there was nothing beyond that. There were no actions and no appeals to youth which is our main focus for practical action – demos, protest and raising awareness of the issue – and we took it upon ourselves.”

“Unlike most Temple Mount movements which deal with the place of worship and the right of prayer for Jews on Temple Mount alongside the Mosque – that is not what we strive for. We talk about a proper Temple, as written in the scriptures, not [one that is] adjacent to a mosque.”

“Of course, I will be happy if there is freedom of worship for Jews on Temple Mount and a place of prayer as an interim solution, but that is not our goal and not what we strive for. For me this is clearly the continuation of Zionism. If one reads the writings of the founders of the state, one sees it was clear to them this is a Jewish state, that there will be a Temple in it and that we would conquer all of Eretz Yisrael [Land of Israel].”

“For practical considerations, they concealed this and in fact their dream was forgotten. They toiled over a democratic state and the Jewish matter in the state was side-lined. We don’t want this to happen on Temple Mount as well, that there will be freedom of worship for Jews and that it will be the end of the story, but rather, we strive for the establishment of the Temple.”

The young movement functions on a voluntary basis and there are no paid workers whatsoever in it. The organisation funds its activity via small donors who contribute at the fundraising tables placed from time to time around the country. According to Moris, there were some “heavy” (his term) donors, who took an interest in a significant contribution, but Shabak prevented this. “Every big donor, and there were several, Shabak called them and warned them not to contribute, and they disappeared [i.e., severed all ties].”

According to Moris, the movement’s impact is wide and visible. “Even in secular places, even if they don’t agree with the mode of activity, there is sympathy for the struggle itself. That’s what happens when there is a face to face encounter. A major change can also be seen in the Ultra-Orthodox public, and the number of Ultra-Orthodox people going up to Temple Mount is increasing significantly.”

If in the past, rabbis of the Ultra-Orthodox public and a substantial part of the religious nationalist rabbis were vehemently opposed to ascending the Temple Mount from a Halachic [religious] perspective, things are different now, according to Moris. “Rabbis who were categorically opposed ten years ago, even if they do not allow the ascension of the mountain, they will say there are those who can be trusted on this matter.”

The Hilltop Youths have no religious figures by whose instructions they act, and the same goes for the Hozrim Lahar movement. The activists decide independently on the type of action and consult rabbis Dov Lior, Yisrael Ariel and Menachem Makover only on religious questions.

Moris rejected the judges’ statements that “Temple Mount is a powder keg which is just awaiting a small spark to ignite it and the whole region,” and shared his credo: “The Temple Mount is not a powder keg, but a keg of raw material, and it all depends on the way in which we perceive this. The moment the state pays attention to every post by some Arab on Facebook and gets excited about it, that’s the problem. The Arabs’ claims are not specific to the Temple Mount, but rather as to the very existence of the State of Israel. If we lose Temple Mount, we will lose everything eventually.”

The fact that activism towards the construction of the Temple in the mosques’ stead may, to put it mildly, invoke the wrath of Muslims does not disturb Moris. “We should conduct our affairs as an independent state and do what’s right for us. The moment we act this way, the Arabs will understand the hint and whoever accepts us will stay and whoever does not will leave, just like what happened in ‘48.”

Translation by Ofer Neiman.

 

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  • ray rayz

    There inbred AshkeNAZI’s are a sick bunch of fools actually thinking that they are Judaic.. They should all go back to Poland where they came from… Palestine is for real Semites and not for the fake ones…

    • Mike Abramov

      So, that cuts you out then, doesn’t it.

  • Helen4Yemen

    European Jews = Khazars

    __1 Shlomo Sand: “It is clear that the fear is of an undermining of the historic right to the land. The revelation that the Jews are not from Judea would ostensibly knock the legitimacy for our being here out from under us. Since the beginning of the period of de colonization, settlers have no longer been able to say simply: ‘We came, we won and now we are here’ the way the Americans, the whites in South Africa and the Australians said. There is a very deep fear that doubt will be cast on our right to exist.”– Shlomo Sand interviewed by Haaretz Why do you think the idea of the Khazar origins is so threatening?”

    __ 2 Shlomo Sand: “Any mention of the Khazars in the public arena in Israel came to be tagged as eccentric, freakish, and even menacing…There was anxiety about the legitimacy of the Zionist project, should it become widely known that the settling Jewish masses were not the direct descendents of the “Children of Israel”- such de-legitimization might lead to a broad challenge against the State of Israel’s right to exist.”

    __ 3 Arthur Koestler: “The large majority of surviving Jews in the world is of Eastern European-and thus perhaps mainly of Khazar origin. If so this would mean that their ancestors came not from the Jordan but from the Volga, not from Canaan but from the Caucasus, once believed to be the cradle of the Aryan race; and that genetically they are more closely related to the Hun, Uigur, and Magyar tribes than to the seed of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. Should this turn out to be the case then the term “anti-Semitism” would become void of meaning, based on a misapprehension shared by both the killers and their victims.”

    __ 4 Ralph Schoenman: “Mr. Benjamin Natanayahu is descendant from people who have no relation to Palestine, historic or otherwise, because Ashkenazim or European Jews such as Mr. Natanyahu or ourselves for that matter are in fact descendants of the Khazars, an 8th and 9th century empire that converted to Judaism at that time from which European Jews are descended. Indeed, as I have often discussed, if one wanted scientific data which demonstrates the ethnic origin of European Jewry. Here is the point: European Jews are susceptible to a genetic condition known Tay-Sachs disease, it is analogous to what African Americans suffer, sickle cell anemia. What is interesting about this is that only European Jews are susceptible to this genetic trait. No Semitic people is. That means none of the Jews form the Arab East, Yemen or Iraq or North Africa or any of the areas of the region, because like their Arab brothers and sisters as are the Arab Jews.”

    • neluroman

      Dear Helen, I know you are under a self-inflicted moratory over any dialog with someone who knows what it is about in Middle East, but your obsession with Ashkenazis prompted me, once again, to try to explain you a few simple things you appear to not understand. In the aftermath of Ottoman Empire collapse- you know, Ottoman Empire had colonized Middle East for almost 500 years- the entire region was left practically without any authority. Because most of social frame of Middle East was tribal, these tribes were fighting ones others for land. Trying to stop this blood spill the League of Nations appointed a few European countries as “country- mandatory” with a clear mandate to sop this unnecessary bloodshed, at the same time, at UN, a special commission was resolute in its enterprise to determine which land belongs to whom. Some criteria were laid down for which group of people, tribe, association of tribes had the right to a country of their own. Among those groups of people who met these criteria were Iraqis, Saudis, Jordanians, Syrians, Lebanese and some others. And even if not all all these peoples get their de facto self- determination, de jure their nationhood and statehood had been established. The Jews also met these criteria and consecutively a part of what is now called Palestine was attributed them. Why not? Why should they have been the exception? Of course, neither then was nor there is now such a reason. Certainly, not all were content with what they got. The Iranian -Iraqis war; Iraq versus Kuwait war, the civil war in Lebanon, all these had a root cause in how the land was distributed among all these peoples by the UN commission At that time- you should keep in mind that- many of the territorial disputes were solved exclusively by war. You should also notice the fact that the people you call Ashkenazi had no role in this story until this point.-the land of Israel was attributed to the Jews who have never left Palestine and not to Jewish diaspora.Therefore, continuing with our story, the thing continued in this manner. In 1947 the UN’s Special Commission for Palestine issued a partition plan for Palestine by which, in practical terms, Arabs controlled 80% of what is generally considered to be the historic land of Palestine. At the same time the Jews barely held 18% of this territory- the rest, Gaza was occupied by Egypt. According to this plan the city of Jerusalem was to remain under an international mandate. Whereas the Jews reluctantly accepted this plan, the Arabs refused to accept it and instead decided to go to war for what they saw as their inalienable right to all Palestine including the entire city of Jerusalem. Unfortunately for them they lost these wars and once with that they lost territories that initially had been attributed them by the “partition plan”. According to international laws, which clearly specifies that if a country goes to war over a disputed territory and lose the war, the attacked country has the right retain that territory. Therefore, legally Israel could retain the territory gained in the war, but instead it didn’t make a secret from the fact that it is prepared to give back that territory in change for peace. However, Arabs rejected this offer once again and preferredinstead to go to war once again -the 1973 War. And anew, they lost the war. In the end, Helen, I tell you once again, whether Ashkenazi are Jews or not has nothing to do with the creation of the state of Israel. If Jews from Europe immigrated to Israel and became Israelis, so did a lot of Arabs from the land of Palestine’s neighboring countries, and who became Palestinians overnight. I remind you also that Israel is a secular country where law and not religion dictates the state’s policy. That is why Israel has handed over the keys of the Temple Mouth to Jordan and not to some Jewish religious party.

      • Mike Abramov

        Sir – Your reply to Helen4Yemen is to be admired for it’s content and objectivity. However, it is wasted on this woman. She is both a troll and an idiot. A person who will not learn.

        • neluroman

          Well….maybe we should not condemn Helen for what she thinks. She most probably was educated that all what her peers have told her is “letter of law.” And now we tell her that that is not the case. It is not easy for anyone to accept something like this, specially for a women educated in a Middle east country, as appears to be the case with Helen.

          • Helen4Yemen

            Funny, someone like you, who writes very poor English can distinguish between who is more or less educated, huh?

          • neluroman

            Yes funny, but you forget one little detail . Education is not necessary connected to how well or less well someone knows a foreign language. English is not my native language nor I’m living in an Anglo-Saxon country. And then, you know it very well, I’m not here for my skills in English, but for my knowledge of history, the history of Middle East, to be more exactly. On the other side, you have never given away any clue about what country you live in, or at least, which country you were born in. And that confers you an advantage you have no qualms in exploiting it.

          • Helen4Yemen

            Is the Ashkenazi = European? Yes or no?

            If no, then state what the Ashkenazi is.

          • Mike Abramov

            Of course, you are right. I do get annoyed with replies that are dictatorial. However, on a site like this, what else should I expect?

      • Helen4Yemen

        __
        You: ” The Jews also met these criteria and consecutively a part of what is now called Palestine was attributed them. Why not? Why should they have been the exception? “ Me: If the German Jew is entitled to Palestine, explain to me why not the German Christian?
        __
        You: ” the land of Israel was attributed to the Jews who have never left Palestine and not to Jewish diaspora. “ Me: Why is ‘Jewish diaspora’ entitled to anything? Are you saying that the German Jew left Palestine and became white-European and the Nigerian Jew left Palestine and became black-African? Are you that deluded?
        __
        You: ” Whereas the Jews reluctantly accepted this plan, the Arabs refused to accept it and instead decided to go to war “ Me: You think the Algerians would have allowed the French to partition their land? Isn’t the Ashkenazi just as European as the French?
        __
        You: ” Therefore, legally Israel could retain the territory gained in the war, “ Me: It is not ‘Israel” but a bunch of stampeding foreign Jews from Germany, Poland, Russia and so on.
        __
        You: ” If Jews from Europe immigrated to Israel and became Israelis, so did a lot of Arabs from the land of Palestine’s neighboring countries, and who became Palestinians overnight. “ Me: Who gave permission for German, Russian Jews to come to Palestine? Why not Russian and German Christians?
        __
        You: ” I remind you also that Israel is a secular country where law and not religion dictates the state’s policy. “ Me: It is an apartheid thingie.

        Your id was on my blocked list, did I not tell you in the past that I no longer wanted to have exchanges with you?

        • neluroman

          Dear Helen, religion is not the main criterium that renders as a group of people to become a nation. Common language, common values, common history and common held principle that they are all a nation, a people are the main criteria after which a large group of people can be considered entitled to have a country of their own. Religion can be at most a bonus, but not the determinant factor in a statehood of a group of people.
          Sometimes just happens to be forced to leave your country, your people, but that doesn’t mean that you have been deprived of being part of your people, except if you don’t do it by your own will. And simply, even if at some time in history many, many Jews were forced out of their country, most of them have never renounced of being Jews and to the dream of someday returning at home.
          Your parallel with Algerians is a fallacy. Let me explain why. You know that prior to Palestine partition this land had belonged to Ottomans, and Ottomans, I am sure you know it, were neither Arabs nor (ever less) Palestinians. But in the wake of WWI, Ottomans, pure and simply, vanished off history, and this fact made as Palestine to become some sort of “no-man-land” where groups of distinct people were fighting ones others for the right of owning that land. Europeans came and tried to stop this bloodshed by portioning the land among the distinct groups of people who reclaimed a country of their own on this territory. The Europeans could not turn a blind eye to the fact the Jews were not Arabs but a distinct group of people who considered themselves to be a nation. Could Europeans neglect this indubitably truth? No of course, they couldn’t.
          Once what someone gets the citizenship of a country it doesn’t matter what country he/she comes from.
          Palestine has been for centuries a center of both strong emigration as well as strong immigration. For centuries people have come in and out Palestine. It is true that in the last decades of the IXth century and early decades of the XXth century it was a strong Jewish emigration. They, (the Jews)for first time in Middle East, introduced idea of ” monthly wage” . It was something new, something that made as the life of an individual to be more stable from an economic point of view. This fact prompted as a lot of Arabs from all across the Arabian Peninsula to come to Palestine exactly because of this form of payment. Therefore, who permitted the Jews to come to Palestine permitted also the Arabs to come there. “Why not Russian and German Christians?” you ask, Simply! They didn’t want to come.
          In Israel, the Arab Israelis have the same rights like the Jewish Israelis and enjoy more liberties than their co-religioners in Gaza and other Islamic States.

        • neluroman

          1)Dear Helen, religion is not the main criterium that renders as a group of people to become a nation. Common language, common values, common history and common held principle that they are all a nation, a people are the main criteria after which a large group of people can be considered entitled to have a country of their own. Religion can be at most a bonus, but not the determinant factor in a statehood of a group of people.

          2) Sometimes just happens to be forced to leave your country, your people, but that doesn’t mean that you have been deprived of being part of your people, except if you don’t do it by your own will. And simply, even if at some time in history many, many Jews were forced out of their country, most of them have never renounced of being Jews and to the dream of someday returning at home.

          3)Your parallel with Algerians is a fallacy. Let me explain why. You know that prior to Palestine partition this land had belonged to Ottomans, and Ottomans, I am sure you know it, were neither Arabs nor (ever less) Palestinians. But in the wake of WWI, Ottomans, pure and simply, vanished off history, and this fact made as Palestine to become some sort of “no-man-land” where groups of distinct people were fighting ones others for the right of owning that land. Europeans came and tried to stop this bloodshed by portioning the land among the distinct groups of people who reclaimed a country of their own on this territory. The Europeans could not turn a blind eye to the fact the Jews were not Arabs but a distinct group of people who considered themselves to be a nation. Could Europeans neglect this indubitably truth? No of course, they couldn’t.
          to be continued…..

          • neluroman

            ……the continuation
            4)Once what someone gets the citizenship of a country it doesn’t matter what country he/she comes from.
            5)Palestine has been for centuries a center of both strong emigration as well as strong immigration. For centuries people have come in and out Palestine. It is true that in the last decades of the IXth century and early decades of the XXth century it was a strong Jewish emigration. They, (the Jews)for first time in Middle East, introduced idea of ” monthly wage” . It was something new, something that made as the life of an individual to be more stable from an economic point of view. This fact prompted as a lot of Arabs from all across the Arabian Peninsula to come to Palestine exactly because of this form of payment. Therefore, who permitted the Jews to come to Palestine permitted also the Arabs to come there. “Why not Russian and German Christians?” you ask, Simply! They didn’t want to come.
            6)In Israel, the Arab Israelis have the same rights like the Jewish Israelis and enjoy more liberties than their co-religioners in Gaza and other Islamic states.
            Helen, I know it is hard for you to accept something that shakes your entire concept about an important matter, but I suggest you think logically, that is universal and doesn’t rely on what sort of education you were raised in.

          • Helen4Yemen

            __
            You: ” Common language, common values, common history and common held principle that they are all a nation, “ Me: What common language did the Yemeni Jew share with the German Jew? None!
            What common history did the Yemeni Jew share with the German Jew? None!
            The Yemeni Jew has nothing in common with the German Jew except for a religion. Did the Yemeni Jew cook Yemeni style or German Style. You are so deluded and your delusion is so thick there is no hope for you.
            __
            You: ” a people are the main criteria after which a large group of people can be considered entitled to have a country of their own. “ Me: The Ashkenazi are Europeans and their country should have been in Europe.
            __
            You: ” Religion can be at most a bonus, but not the determinant factor in a statehood of a group of people. “ Me: Nothing connects the German, Russian, Ethiopian, Ugandan, Chinese, Indian, Yemeni Jews except for a common religion. Nothing!
            __
            You: ” Sometimes just happens to be forced to leave your country, your people, but that doesn’t mean that you have been deprived of being part of your people, “ Me: The Ashkenazi’s ancestral homeland is Europe and only Europe. Look in the mirror.
            __
            You: ” And simply, even if at some time in history many, many Jews were forced out of their country, most of them have never renounced of being Jews and to the dream of someday returning at home. “ Me: Only the European Jews were forced out of Europe 109 times and not African or Asian or Arab Jews. Ashkenazi = European.
            __
            You: ” this land had belonged to Ottomans, and Ottomans, I am sure you know it, were neither Arabs nor (ever less) Palestinians. But in the wake of WWI, Ottomans, pure and simply, vanished off history, and this fact made as Palestine to become some sort of “no-man-land” where groups of distinct people were fighting ones others for the right of owning that land. “ Me: Why didn’t other Ottoman occupied Arab land become “no-man-land’ and only Palestine?
            __
            You: ” Europeans came and tried to stop this bloodshed by portioning the land among the distinct groups of people who reclaimed a country of their own on this territory. “ Me: Therefore, you do not consider the Ashkenazi to be Europeans? Funny! What are the Ashkenazi if not Europeans?
            __
            You: ” The Europeans could not turn a blind eye to the fact the Jews were not Arabs but a distinct group of people who considered themselves to be a nation. Could Europeans neglect this indubitably truth? No of course, they couldn’t. “ Me:
            Arab Jews = Arab
            African Jews = African
            European Jews = European (look in the mirror)

    • Mike Abramov

      FYI – Shlomo Sand is someone i have heard speak here in London. It’s no good citing him. I feel that he has a lot of personal issues from his childhood as a holocaust survivor.

      Ralph Schoenman? I will google him.

      Arthur Koestler – the same.

      Both are devoid of any spirituality and cite examples that the Nazis used to define the Aryan race. Are the Nazis a people you relate to?

      As for your constant reference to the Khazars as false Jews, as I have said before, being a Jew has NOTHING to do with the genes. It is spiritual……rather like finding God. Israel allows people of all denominations to get close to God, but in many Muslim countries, one has top be a Muslim to be near God. Is that what you want?

      • Helen4Yemen

        -Arthur Koestler said Ashkenazi were Khazars, = bad.
        -Shlomo Sand said Ashkenazi were Khazars = bad
        -Ralph Schoenman said Ashkenazi are Khazars, bad

        If your mother and grandmother said same, you will label them bad, but anyone who denies they are Khazars are good. Right?

        • Mike Abramov

          Helen – are you a slow learner, or what? If you are an Arab living in Europe what are you doing here on Christian land?

          It’s all bollocks. If you persist with accepting only what you want to believe, then you lack the intellect to continue a dialogue with anyone that has opposing views to yours.

          For the last time, there is no evidence that Khazaria is the origin of the Ashkenazim because if that was true, why are they called Ashkenazim?

          Answer the question and prove me wrong.

          • Helen4Yemen

            You ain’t got no Yiddish-Kop!

        • Mike Abramov

          Helen – as promised, I have researched Koestler.

          His ‘theory’ that Ashkenazim originated from Khazar was a ploy to protect the Jews from anti-Semitism. He advocated that if the world believed that the Jews were from a Turkic race, the hatred of the European Jew would dissipate. He was wrong

          Schoenman was just another left-wing Jew who did not have the depth of spirituality to understand the Zionist and the passion for returning to Zion.

          Your reply please?

          • Helen4Yemen

            38 Ashkenazi Jewish Genetic Diseases (and more recent genetic diseases have been detected among the Ashkenazi.) The carrier rates for Arab Jews is the same as that of the general population, which is very rare. The Ashkenazi have zero genetic relation with Arab Jews. The numbers within parenthesis are the carrier rates for the European Ashkenazi.

            1 Bloom Syndrome ( 1/134 )
            2 Canavan Disease ( 1/55 )
            3 Cystic Fibrosis ( 1/24 )
            4 Familial Dysautonomia ( 1/31 )
            5 Familial Hyperinsulinism ( 1/68 )
            6 Fanconi Anemia C ( 1/100 )
            7 Gaucher Disease ( 1/15 )
            8 Glycogen Storage Disease 1A ( 1/64 )
            9 Joubert Syndrome 2 ( 1/110 )
            10 Lipoamide Dehydrogenase Deficiency (E3) ( 1/107 )
            11 Maple Syrup Urine Disease 1B ( 1/97 )
            12 Mucolipidosis IV ( 1/89 )
            13 Nemaline Myopathy ( 1/168 )
            14 Niemann-Pick Disease ( 1/115 )
            15 Spinal Muscular Atrophy ( 1/41 )
            16 Tay-Sachs Disease ( 1/27 )
            17 Usher IF ( 1/147 )
            18 Usher III ( 1/120 )
            19 Walker Warburg ( 1/120 )
            20 3-Phosphoglycerate Dehydrogenase Deficiency ( 1/280 )
            21 Abetalipoproteinemia ( 1/180 )
            22 Alport Syndrome, Autosomal Recessive ( 1/188 )
            23 Arthrogryposis, Mental Retardation and Seizures ( 1/373 )
            24 Bardet-Biedl Syndrome ( 1/107 )
            25 Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase ll Deficiency ( 1/51 )
            26 Congenital Amegakaryocytic Thrombocytopenia ( 1/55 )
            27 Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation la ( 1/57 )
            28 Dyskeratosis Congenita, Autosomal Recessive ( 1/203 )
            29 Ehlers-Danlos VllC ( 1/248 )
            30 Fragile X Syndrome ( 1/115 )
            31 Galactosemia ( 1/172 )
            32 Multiple Sulphatase Deficiency ( 1/320 )
            33 Polycystic Kidney Disease, Autosomal Recessive ( 1/107 )
            34 Retinitis Pigmentosa 59 ( 1/118 )
            35 Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome ( 1/36 )
            36 Tyrosinemia l ( 1/150 )
            37 Wilson Disease ( 1/70 )
            38 Zellweger Syndrome ( 1/172 )