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Creating new perspectives since 2009

 

Dr Elif Selin Calik

Dr Elif Selin Calik is a journalist and independent researcher. She is a regular contributor to publications like TRT World, Daily Sabah, Rising Powers in Global Governance and Hurriyet Daily News. She was one of the the founders of the In-Depth News Department of Anadolu News Agency and participated in United Nations COP23 in Bonn as an observer. She holds an MA in Cultural Studies from the International University of Sarajevo and a second MA in Global Diplomacy from SOAS, University of London.

 

Items by Dr Elif Selin Calik

  • The Turkish earthquakes: Have the wounds healed?

    I lost 34 members from my family last year and my grandmother lost her treasured house in one night.  Since I woke up this morning, I have been trying to think of words to describe the pain we experienced in the wake of the 6 February 2023 earthquakes in...

  • Applying climate justice for young generations - COP28 and Middle East and energy transition

    “In my country a lot of people, including my mother, can’t afford to buy biogas for cooking. So, we must rely on charcoal and firewood. If we want countries like Malawi to make the transition to biogas, they should be supported with funds to decrease its cost,” said Rana, from Sudan...

  • Destruction of the ‘Mavi Marmara’ monument draws international attention to Israel war crimes

    A book titled “Midnight on the Mavi Marmara: The Attack on the Gaza Freedom Flotilla and How it Changed the Course of the Israel/Palestine Conflict”, consists of 48 essays compiled by Arab-American author and professor, Mustafa Bayoumi. Its diverse accounts, which were published only three months after the attack, include witness testimonies, rebuttals of...

  • Cooperation between rival transport corridors could change global economies

    On the sidelines of the G20 Summit last month, the leaders of India, the US, Saudi Arabia, the UAE, France, Italy, Germany and the EU announced a new maritime and overland transport corridor between Asia and Europe: the India, Middle East Europe Economic Corridor (IMEC). Also present at the...

  • Anti-Arab sentiments in Turkiye will not save Turkish Lira

    Last week, a Turkish man was detained in connection with an assault on a Kuwaiti tourist in the northern city of Trabzon. The attack was widely publicised in the local Turkish and social media. Racist attacks in Turkiye, especially in Istanbul, towards Arabs first became apparent with the arrival of Syrian refugees....

  • Will the UAE COP28 roadmap help the region for the energy revolution?

    This week, a ground-breaking green energy investment of the UAE hit all the media outlets: The UAE has pledged $4.5 billion to help speed up the development of clean energy projects in Africa. This means UAE pitches itself as Africa’s carbon credits leader. According to the American consultancy, Mckinsey, the initiative aims to...

  • Turkiye’s post-quake city transformation: Finance vs policy

    “It is like The Pianist movie scene with collapsed buildings. Just like how Roman Polanski depicts a city of a war-torn country with devastated cities. Now, Kahramanmaras is the same.” This is how one of my journalist friends who witnessed the devastation of the earthquakes described the scenes the day after....

  • Turkiye NATO agenda: Sweden bid, F-16s and war mediation

    Last week was, by all standards, a historical turning point for the relationship between Turkiye and its NATO allies. Three important developments were witnessed at the Vilnius summit. First, there was the long-awaited breakthrough in negotiations, which allowed Turkish President, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, to finally approve Sweden’s membership. Secondly,...

  • Hydrogen money can be beneficial for green infrastructure in the Middle East

    The conversation about climate change needs to shift from simply reducing carbon emissions to ensuring developing nations can take part in a diversified green economy in the Middle East region. Yet, first it is important to accept that governments have hardly any source of revenues, independent from oil and...

  • The challenges facing Erdogan’s new cabinet

    After a very tight first round, Turkiye’s Erdogan has emerged the clear winner of the presidential election last Sunday. After overcoming the biggest political challenges ever faced, with a coalition comprising six opposition parties, he will hope his third term will further tighten his grip on power. Opponents have expressed dismay,...

  • Is Turkiye democratic enough not to apply forced repatriation and politicising refugees?

    Syrian refugees in Turkiye have emerged as a political flashpoint in the country’s ongoing election journey, with leading opposition candidates competing to offer the most aggressive proposal to deport the refugees to Syria. Although the plans vary in substance, they share a disregard for international law – and Turkiye’s...

  • Are Turkiye’s nuclear power ambitions a threat to regional safety?

    Everyone who watched the American disaster thriller movie called ‘The China Syndrome’, directed by James Bridges in 1979, remembers that the events leading up to the “accident” in ‘The China Syndrome’ are, indeed, based on actual occurrences at nuclear plants. Turkiye’s newly launched nuclear power plant reminds us of...

  • On World Water Day, spare a thought for the Middle East

    The Middle East may have an abundance of oil and gas, but it has very few natural water sources. This is fast becoming a source of tension. According to three UN Secretaries-General, water may well be the cause of future conflict in the region. “The next war in the...

  • Aid Diplomacy after earthquake

    While the world is dealing with the first anniversary of the deadly war in Ukraine, the solidarity shown towards Turkish society after its devastating earthquake is one of the best examples of “aid diplomacy” in modern history. Even though Turkiye was against Sweden’s and Finland’s membership of NATO, less...

  • The Middle East and its move away from oil and gas

    In 2022, the biggest energy issue in the Middle East was Organisation of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) oil cut as the world economy entered into a period of ‘heightened uncertainty and rising challenges’. In October, OPEC cut its 2022 forecast for growth in world oil demand for a...

  • Turkiye’s energy outlook and achieving energy independence

    “This century will be, to a large extent, about energy. Energy security is a theme where NATO is in the process of defining its added value. Protection of critical energy infrastructure,” these were the words of Jaap de Hoop Scheffer, the former NATO secretary-general, they were delivered during a...

  • Global energy markets apocalypse in 2022

    The year 2022 saw the energy topic return intensely to the attention of media, political leaders and public opinion after Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in February. Russia’s war has had huge impacts on the global energy system, disrupting supply and demand patterns and fracturing long‐standing trading relationships. Each energy crisis...

  • COP27 has shown we need a new taxation order in the world

    For three decades, world leaders at the UN Climate Change Conference (COP) have pledged to cut greenhouse gas emissions and greener energy sources. This year, COP27 finished with an agreement for an historic “Loss and Damage Fund”. In negotiations that went down to the wire over the weekend, countries reached...

  • IEA World Energy Outlook 2022 and energy transition following global energy crisis

    This week, the International Energy Agency’s World Energy Outlook 2022 was published, highlighting the UN Climate change Conference (COP27) and energy transition in the age of the Ukraine war. The 524 page IEA report IEA speaks of the need for a 38 per cent fall in CO2 emissions to 1.5...

  • Russia gas and Turkiye

    To produce energy takes ages, but setting up new diplomatic ties, changes day by day. Even 24 hours are too many to follow all these changes in the 21st Century’s energy wars. Literally, we have seen this in 2020 during the energy price war between Mohammed Bin Salman and...

  • Aegean Sea tensions threaten NATO’ s unity

    For the first time in its long history, NATO’s unity is under threat as a result of the rift between two of its members; Turkiye and Greece and their manoeuvres in the Aegean Sea. The latest crisis between the two began in August when Turkiye accused its neighbour of...

  • Queen Elizabeth II and Turkiye

    The United Kingdom’s Queen Elizabeth II died last Thursday, aged 96. The flowers for her funeral will apparently be shipped from Turkiye. This is not as unusual as it first appears. In 2008, during her first visit to Turkiye after more than 30 years, the Queen delivered a speech...

  • Why Africa needs Turkish drones

    After NATO countries, African countries are also knocking at the door of Turkiye for collaboration with the defence industry. With Turkiye’s Bayraktar TB2 Drone, Turkiye has been experiencing high demand on collaboration with African countries. In Africa, the TB2 Bayraktar model is in high demand after it was used...

  • Ukrainian refugees should be resettled and empowered before it’s too late

    At least 12 million people have fled their homes since Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, the UN has confirmed. More than five million are refugees in neighbouring countries, while seven million others are believed to be internally displaced within Ukraine itself. If there is no ceasefire, the UN High Commissioner...