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    Post-coup, what now for Al-Ahram and freedom of expression?

    Post-military coup, the political reality has changed in Egypt. Newspapers and television stations have been closed down; the legislative council has been dissolved; Islamic leaders have been arrested; and pro-coup journalists have been tasked with demonising the legitimate president of the country and the Islamic movement. One of the...
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    Petrodollar largesse explodes after coup success

    Why were the Gulf States of Kuwait, the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia so unhappy at the success of the January 2011 revolution in Egypt and so passionate about the June 30 coup? The revolution had, after all, removed one of Israel's "strategic treasures". Why are these states...
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    Setting out to defame a political opponent

    When a journalist sets out to defame a political opponent, whoever it may be, finding the reasoning behind it will not be difficult, whatever the motive may be, whatever interests are involved and whichever group foots the bill. Those prone to jumping from one ideological box to another, or...
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    Morsi's support for Palestinian cause "fuelled coup"

    The Vice President of Egypt's Al-Wasat Party has claimed that President Morsi's support for the Palestinian cause "fuelled" the coup against him. The result, said Dr Essam Sultan, is that he has been accused of "extreme conspiracy". In an exclusive interview with Alresalah, Sultan confirmed that despite the wishes...
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    Memo to El-Baradei - You Can't Eat Neoliberalism

    Shortly before riding into the vice-presidency of Egypt on the back of military tanks, Muhammad el-Baradei told Foreign Policy "You Can't Eat Sharia" in a criticism of the policies (or apparent lack of) of the previous Morsi presidency. The comment appears to have been throwaway humour intended to impress...
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    What does the military coup mean?

    One of the characteristics of military coups is that the forces which carry them out rarely know much about the objectives of their actions. Indeed, this is true of many military manoeuvres. The soldiers act without knowing which political objectives will be achieved because of their actions; nor do...
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    The drums of civil war are beating

    Although I heard General Abdul Fattah Al-Sisi call on the people to take to the streets and squares on Friday to give him a mandate to deal with the violence in the country, I still can't quite believe it and am not alone in my feelings. Several people called...
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    Who benefits from distorting the January revolution?

    My biggest fear is that the uprising Egypt witnessed on June 30 2013 will be utilised to attack the revolution of January 25 2011 in a manner that makes aligning with Mubarak and his regime an option. It is as if we are in the process of re-writing the...
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    Egypt has been warned of the violence to come – by General Al-Sisi himself

    It is not often that the international community gets ample notice and an invitation to stop atrocities before they begin. This is precisely what happened earlier this week in Egypt. General Abdel Fatah Al-Sisi, leader of the coup-that's-not-a-coup, gave a speech that has to be read as paving the...
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    The Muslim Brotherhood and the army

    For the wide-eyed reporter looking for a dramatic opener to a piece on Egypt, the pro-Morsi sit-in at Rabea al-Adaweya can look like a war-zone. There are barbed-wire barricades and army APCs. Days ago, 51 people were gunned down in the street here. With a supposedly impartial inquiry underway,...
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    Egypt must get back on the path of democratic change

    The military coup in Egypt this month and the bloody attacks since, perpetrated by the military and police against supporters of constitutional legitimacy, will form an important turning point in the political history of the Middle East. Its impact will be felt beyond Egypt, marking a decisive moment between...
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    Egypt's neglected questions

    I have a number of questions regarding the current events in Egypt. The most notable of which are as follows: On July 23, Al-Ahram newspaper published a headline noting that the Attorney General ordered the detainment of Dr. Mohammed Morsi for 15 days on charges of collaborating with Hamas....
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    Today, we are all the Muslim Brotherhood

    I criticised a group of Sudanese who reported that Egypt's President Mohammed Morsi collapsed in front of investigators. They also said that Khairat Al-Shater, the deputy leader of the Muslim Brotherhood, responded to Morsi's boast that he is the president of the Republic of Egypt by screaming, "Egypt is...
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    Media portray crisis in Tunisia as Egyptian scenario despite clear differences

    After the events of the Arab Spring, observers in Europe and America turned to watch Tunisia's development. The consensus was that if Tunisia could make a successful democratic transition from Ben Ali's autocracy then it would be a model for the other "Arab Spring countries". Indeed, over the past...
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    Tamarod appears to have eased the way for Mubarak remnants to return

    In 2011, protests in Egypt felled a military dictator, Hosni Mubarak. The mass protests of the 25 January Revolution were a rejection of the corruption and repression engendered by six decades of military rule. Two years later, and a second wave of protests have felled a very different president....
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    Is America working against its own interests in Egypt?

    For the first time since the coup, the US administration has taken a clear position towards the situation in Egypt. Secretary of State John Kerry has said that the army is "restoring democracy", which means that he backs the military action very clearly. Kerry's declaration came amid increasing tension...
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    Is it almost time for the Brotherhood?

    Ever since the huge June 30 protests, Egypt has been running on its own time zone. The new military-led government has issued a series of 48-hour warnings aimed at moving things along, speeding up the takeover. The first was for President Morsi and the political establishment to sort out...
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    Disaster in Egypt has been delayed, not averted

    I have spent many hours of the last week in conversation with Egyptians, both with supporters of the removal of the elected Islamist government of Mohamed Morsi and his supporters gathered in their tens of thousands around the Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque in Cairo. This follows a similar visit in...
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    Bringing Al-Sisi down from the tree

    A fool may throw a stone into a well but 100 sane people cannot remove it, says the proverb. To paraphrase its sentiments, a few crazy people can put Al-Sisi at the top of the tree but who can bring him down? This is a complex and serious question,...
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    The perseverance of the legitimacy supporters upsets coup leaders' calculations

    Not in their worst nightmares could the coup leaders have imagined that events would have unfolded as they did. They had carefully drafted each detail and planned the coup diligently. They started by dissolving the General Assembly, while planning for the dissolution of the Shura Council, and they worked...
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    The coup against democracy is par for the course in Egyptian politics

    In January 1924, Saad Zaghloul became the Prime Minister of Egypt after the Wafd Party won the parliamentary elections. This victory came after the birth of a new Egypt and the adoption of a new constitution declaring the country to be a sovereign state on February 28, 1922. The...
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    Sit-ins surround the coup as the pressure grows

    Egypt's coup appears to be surrounded by protest sit-ins. Just as the military is suppressing civil unrest, with the backing of a compliant media, so too are the coup authorities facing a barrage of ethical and humanitarian questions over its actions. This has led to them seeking help from...
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    Government and opposition need to learn how to be democratic

    Over the past few weeks, I have been dismayed by the degree of intolerance and rigidity of the quarrelling parties in Egypt; both have been on the defensive, unwilling to listen to the other. Hearts have hardened and minds have closed, causing further deterioration in the situation. I am...
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    Unprecedented security cooperation between Egypt and Israel in the Sinai

    On Friday, in Egypt's largely lawless Sinai Peninsula, a drone strike killed at least four suspected Islamic militants and destroyed a rocket launcher. The attack, which came one day after Israel temporarily closed its airport in the holiday resort of Eilat, near to the Sinai, is widely believed to...
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    Thoughts on the current attack against Egypt's Islamic identity

    The analysis of the events in Egypt after the military coup remains of vital importance, especially for those interested in political affairs. This not only includes those within the Islamic movement itself, but also every nationalist who cares about the wellbeing and future of this country. In his interview...
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    Why is the Egyptian Regime Demonizing Palestinians?

    Palestinians know that if Cairo sneezes then Palestine, especially Gaza, is first to get the flu. Indeed, Gaza often serves as a tool of regime policy, as was the case during the Mubarak years and during the short-lived government led by the Muslim Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice Party, and...
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    The stubborn Egyptian state is the biggest obstacle

    It goes without saying that Egyptians are divided. They were divided before the January 25th revolution of 2011 and they were divided once again after the short honeymoon period following the revolution. The Egyptian people were divided before the coup against their President Dr. Mohammed Morsi and they were...
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    Egyptian crisis at a deadlock

    Egypt needs a miracle. The "positive" development in the past 10 days is that we have moved from denying the crisis to acknowledging its existence, but there remains uncertainty about how to solve it. While foreign diplomats were invited to intervene in the search for a way out, some...
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    Egypt's military will not get away with human rights abuses

    Just over a year ago, Egypt threw off the shackles of its military dictatorship and took on the mantle of a civil democracy, becoming for a short period, the torchbearer of liberty and equality throughout the Arab world. On 24 June 2012, Mohamed Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood's Freedom...
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    While Al-Sisi and his liberal partners in crime are the main culprits, the US must share responsibility

    Let's not beat about the bush. What happened on Wednesday in Egypt was the use of excessive force by soldiers and police. We have witnessed a massacre in every sense of the word, a massacre the likes of which were carried out by security forces during the final days...
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    The US should impose sanctions on Egypt as it did with the Burmese military

    Wednesday's events in Rabaa, Egypt, have shocked the world. An estimated 464 people are dead – with the death toll growing – in the greatest loss of life on a single day since Mohamed Morsi was ousted by the military on 3 July. The bloodshed started when security forces...
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    Journalists under attack in Egypt

    With the official death toll continuing to rise and sources within the Muslim Brotherhood estimating that thousands of Egyptians were killed in the massacres at Rabaa Al-Adawiyya and Al-Nahda Squares on Wednesday, it would be a surprise if the number of dead and wounded journalists didn't also rise. In...
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    The coup and the violence in Egypt

    The coup depends on spreading a state of violence alongside intimidation and fear throughout the whole society. The coup's media has been trying to accuse the Muslim Brotherhood of violence since the first day of the coup in order to intimidate society. The coup's leaders would later use that...
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    What's next for Egypt after dispersing the protesters?

    What must be said first is that cornering the protests against the military coup in two arenas only, Raba'a and Al Nahda, was a failed attempt at limiting them to a tight space. Everyone knows that the protests of legitimacy supporters over the last month and a half were...
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    Egypt Military Crackdown: Bodies pile up as escalation continues amid the slaughter

    The EuroMid Observer for Human Rights has documented the killing of at least 1215 protesters across Egypt, of which 914 protesters killed in Cairo, after Egyptian Armed Forces moved in to clear the two sit-ins of Pro-Morsi supporters on Wednesday 14 August. Among the victims are children, women and...
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    On the cheap blood of Egyptians

    If an innocent and good-intentioned citizen who monitors Egypt's news from abroad read Dr. Hazem Al-Beblawi's recent statement, in which he announced his rejection of reconciling with and forgiving those with blood on their hands, I would not rule out the possibility of this citizen giving Al-Beblawi the benefit...
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    Egypt Military Crackdown: What is an Egyptian human life worth?

    Prior to the 14 August clashes, the two main protest sites, al-Nahda and Rabaa al-Adawiya, were densely populated with women, children, and men who have been staging a 47 days-long peaceful sit-in to protest the removal of President Mohammed Morsy. Both sit-ins would at certain moments have a gathering...
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    Fatah seeks help from abroad

    The bloodshed in Egypt continues at the hands of those who do not care for Egypt's wellbeing and do not want stability so that they can continue to secure their own interests by promoting the coup. But the coup is being sustained by bloodshed and violence that will only...
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    If America wants to rescue its influence in Egypt, it must reconcile its contesting interests, before it is too late

    America has a problem with Egypt: that much is obvious. Ever since President Mohammed Morsi was deposed by the military on 3 July, the US and other western powers have been scrambling around to find a coherent response to the crisis. This has become more pressing as the bloodshed...
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    The Muslim Brotherhood will not turn to violence to fight the coup in Egypt

    With news of the acquittal and imminent release of Egypt's deposed dictator Hosni Mubarak, the military regime has exposed its ugly face to full view. Since the counterrevolutionary coup began on 30 June, the Egyptian people have been subjected to unprecedented brutal and humiliating persecution. This has eroded much...
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    Nobody wins in Egypt

    Since the military intervention in Egypt, many observers of Middle Eastern politics have tried to evaluate the geopolitical consequences of the regime change in Egypt. The majority of these scholars assert that Turkey and Qatar would lose from the new political developments in the region, since they were the...
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    Our sadness is doubled

    Our sadness is doubled. We went to sleep with the massacre of prisoners while being transferred to Abu Zaabal prison, and woke up to the slaughter of soldiers in Rafah. In both tragedies, Egyptians had killed other Egyptians, which leads us to say that the two sides share three...
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    This was a coup: we must support Egypt's people, not its generals

    The international response to the events in Egypt has been uncertain and hesitant. Governments and citizens alike seem to have been caught off-guard by the bloodshed that followed the enforced removal of Mohamed Morsi. Initially, there was a dispute about acknowledging whether a coup had taken place. I understand...
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    The Muslim Brotherhood: a history of arrests from 1948 to 2013

    In 1948 they returned from the war in Palestine and were taken to detention camps in Mount Sinai, and today they have won five elections in the post-revolutionary period, including the presidency, only to be taken to the prison and detention centres yet again. This group is none other...
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    Political reconciliation and economic recovery look distant in Egypt

    As the bloodshed in Egypt worsens, the country's economic situation has been consigned to a postscript in most news coverage, while death tolls, political grappling, and western intervention make the headlines. Yet the economic problems which contributed to downfall of President Mohammed Morsi last month remain, and are set...
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    The Muslim Brotherhood's position on terrorism

    Terrorism is an accusation made by the powerful against the weak as an excuse to commit the ugliest forms of terrorism against the weak while making the claim to be combating terrorism. Therefore, this term, or accusation, has not been properly defined in order to allow tyrants to justify...
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    The media and its role in spreading a dichotomous narrative in Tunisia

    To focus on media coverage of the tumultuous convulsions through which post-revolution countries are going may seem a luxury in the current crisis. Yet an analysis of the role of the media in shaping popular perceptions of the Arab Spring revolutions, of their progress through the transition, and of...
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    Asma Al-Beltagi: the child who is an icon of Rabaa Al-Adawiyyah

    Asmaa Mohammed Al-Beltagi was a child in the legal sense of the word. At just 17 years old, she was mature for her age in terms of outlook and actions; she was the only girl in her family. This child was shot and killed by Egyptian security forces on...
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    The foundations on which the Egyptian and Tunisian Springs can be saved

    The new Pinochet-style government in Egypt has followed in the footsteps of the George W Bush administration, with national television now displaying the slogan, permanently and in very clear English, which claims that it is involved in a "war against terrorism". This is not a good omen for the...
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    The detention weapon backfires on coup leaders

    The legitimacy supporters in Egypt are winning every day because of the constant blunders of the coup leaders. The army in Egypt does not behave like a national army which staged a coup but rather like an occupation army. The situation was not left to police, state security and...