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Tunisia: Ennahda accuses Saied of dividing country

Tunisian protest against President Kais Saied during in the capital Tunis on September 18, 2021, denouncing the measures he introduced on July 25 and the extension of the state of emergency. [Yassine Gaidi - Anadolu Agency]
Tunisian protest against President Kais Saied during in the capital Tunis on September 18, 2021, denouncing the measures he introduced on July 25 and the extension of the state of emergency. [Yassine Gaidi - Anadolu Agency]

Tunisia's Ennahda movement has reiterated that it rejects the "dangerous approach" adopted by President Kais Saied since July, when he imposed "emergency measures". His approach, said the movement, is an attempt to abolish the constitution and introduce legislation for presidential rule, bypassing parliament. In doing so, it said, his is trying to divide Tunisians and humiliate opposition groups in what amounts to a "denial" of the 2010/11 revolution.

In a statement issued on Tuesday evening, Ennahda decried the "numbing" of state institutions in the absence of a stable government as well as the suspension of parliament. "This exacerbates the stifling economic, financial and social crisis and further shakes Tunisia's image, especially with our financial and international partners."

The movement pointed out that Saied is intent on abolishing the very constitution that he claims to respect and follow. "To get out of these dangerous conditions," it said, "all political and social forces need to work together for political stability as a prerequisite for an economic and social breakthrough."

All restrictions on travel and freedom of expression in Tunisia should be lifted immediately, insisted Ennahda, which also called for the release of Yassin Ayari MP. "We need an absolute commitment to individual and collective human rights, as well as respect for the constitution and getting members of parliament back to work."

Tunisia: ex-president calls for Saied's dismissal and prosecution

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