Portuguese / Spanish / English

Iraqi premier orders probe into Diyala's sectarian violence

Mourners carry on October 27, 2021, the caskets of victims of yesterday's attack on the village of Al-Rashad in Iraq's eastern Diyala province that reportedly killed at least 11 people, during their funeral in the central shrine city of Najaf. - The attack was blamed on the Islamic State (IS) group, security sources said but another source said that civilians were among those killed by small arms fire in the village, home to many members of the security services. (Photo by Ali NAJAFI / AFP) (Photo by ALI NAJAFI/AFP via Getty Images)
Mourners carry on October 27, 2021, the caskets of victims of yesterday's attack on the village of Al-Rashad in Iraq's eastern Diyala province that reportedly killed at least 11 people [ALI NAJAFI/AFP via Getty Images]

Iraqi Prime Minister, Mustafa Al-Kadhimi, on Thursday ordered a comprehensive investigation into the sectarian clashes in Diyala city during the past two days, which left 23 people dead, Anadolu News Agency reports.

In a statement, the country's Interior Ministry said: "Interior Minister, Othman Al-Ghanimi, conveyed condolences and sympathy of the Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces, Mustafa Al-Kadhimi, to families in the village of Al-Rashad and the village of Nahr Al-Imam in Diyala Governorate."

On Wednesday, eight Sunni civilians were killed by Shia gunmen in an apparent revenge attack in Iraq's eastern Diyala province.

READ: The world will regret bringing Assad in from the cold

The attack came a day after suspected Daesh terrorists attacked the predominantly Shia village of Al-Rashad in Diyala Tuesday evening, killing at least 15 people and injuring 13 others.

In recent months, Daesh terrorists have escalated their attacks, especially in the area between Kirkuk, Salahuddin and Diyala, known as the "Triangle of Death".

In 2017, Iraq declared victory over Daesh by reclaiming all territories the terrorist group controlled since the summer of 2014, about one-third of the country's territory.

The group, however, still maintains sleeper cells in large areas of Iraq, and occasionally launches attacks.

Categories
IraqMiddle EastNews
Show Comments
Show Comments